The Menswear Style Podcast

Scott Golbourne, Co-Founder of AREA CODE

August 04, 2021 Menswear Style Episode 135
The Menswear Style Podcast
Scott Golbourne, Co-Founder of AREA CODE
Show Notes Transcript

AREA CODE was founded in 2018 in Stockholm, Sweden. The brand was born with the aim to facilitate opportunity for people living in developing communities around the globe through selling good quality apparel. The brand strives to build a community; one whereby consumers are connected to people in need. They believe knowledge and education is the key for sustainable growth. For that reason, their mission starts with helping the school GOROM 3, Bambilor, Senegal. This month they're also teaming up with England under 21 and Brighton & Albion star Tariq Lamptey and IK Sirius centre back Joseph Colley. Together with Area-Code they are funding the Area-Code Juvenile Tournament in Takrodi, Ghana, on the 10th - 12th August. Scouts will be coming over from Europe to watch and the aim is to create opportunities for local talent, to spot, grow and nurture future football stars. 

In this episode of the MenswearStyle Podcast we interview Scott Golbourne, Co-Founder of AREA CODE about the mission-based sports chic brand which donates a percentage of its profits to those in need.  The ex-footballer always had a keen interested in fashion and had a plan to enter the clothing market once his football career had ended. The brand has now been operating since 2018 and links its profits to purpose with philanthropic collaborations. Our host Peter Brooker and Scott also talk about the mission and ethos of the brand, media training, charitable projects, and social missions. 

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Hello, and welcome to another episode of The menswear style podcast. I'm your host Pete Brooker. Today on the show I am going to be speaking to Scott golden Scott is one of the founders of area code. He's also an ambassador for area code. And they were founded in 2018. in Stockholm in Sweden, the brand area code was born with the aim to facilitate opportunity for people living in developing communities around the globe through selling good quality apparel. at area code, they strive to build a community whereby consumers are connected to people in need, each purchase has a purpose to make a meaningful impact. Therefore, the more commercially successful area code becomes, the more positive influence a community can provide in areas across the world that require a helping hand for positive change. And here is Scott now to talk about area code in his own words. So I'm Scott gold one on one of the founders, and I'm the spokesperson for for area code, area code. In a nutshell, we're a mission based brand. So we're a sport chic style brand. But we are very mission based. So we take a portion of our profits, and we look to reinvest them back into communities into societies creating opportunities for people around around the world. Okay, great. Sorry about the dog in the background, there's a life getting in the way is when the doorbell goes, but typically waits for a zoom call for a job. But, Scott, you're telling me offline a little bit about your career? Could you just give us a thumbnail sketch of your career and how that led into you becoming an ambassador and founder for areacode? Yeah, so I was a professional footballer for 17 years. 17 seasons, so I ended up coming up meet and one of the other founders three, only four years ago now only kind of came together to discuss some ideas, I was always interested in fashion. But I've always felt that, you know, entering into into business and also keeping one eye on Okay, what, what would life be after football and having something to, you know, keep me keep me focused and have her have a purpose, once, you know, once football comes to an end, and a club, you know, clothing was was something I was really interested in. So, but I always felt that, you know, there would need to be some sort of purpose to the brand. That's, that's that sort of bigger than itself, really. You know, so it, I've always kind of lean towards, you know, kind of link in profits or purpose, I suppose, and saying, Okay, yeah, you know, a business or brand. But how can we really focus on sort of creating some social impact? And those were sort of discussions and, and probably two, two years, maybe going back and forward? A few of our founders got involved and, and also both area code and took it to the ticket sort of market last last year. And what's the reception been? So since you've launched, you've had a year out in the out in the flesh, so to speak? What's it like feeling those products for the first time, you know, wearing them? And how other people engaged with it? Yeah, it's an amazing feeling. Really, I think when we first had the products, you know, on the on the actually get them back, because, you know, there's a lot of back and forward, you know, things are not quite happy to materials, not quite right. zippers, not quite right. You know, see, we did a lot of back and forward. But once we actually got the, the garments to where we were happy. It was a it was a really, it was a sense of achievement in itself without even taking it to, you know, seeing how well it's received. Just actually creating something that you are happy with. I think even that in itself is a difficult task. And we were we were able to do that. So that was that was um, that was an inquiry. We'll fill in. And, you know, to start with, and then the reception was, was amazing, it's quite sort of overwhelming at times to see the type of response that it had, when we launched, you know, the sort of the mission behind behind the brand. And and the ethos, I think, is kind of captured people and got people interested as something slightly different to, to what, to what they're already. And I know, you touched on, we just talked about it offline, how you, you're more of the ambassador and the founder of the brand. But do you have any input in the creative direction as well? Have you ever taken a hand to any of the designs? Yes, definitely. So especially the the first collection it was it was nice to get involved in, in the design stuff. You know, designing a few pieces have been real input into into how, you know, this is this is going to look, we have a designer, but it was nice to be able to kind of, you know, bring ideas to the table and, and they will, it will be brought to life. And yes, and noes on certain things. So yeah, that's something that something that I was happy to get involved in, and will probably continue to do. So. Moving forward. Albeit, we started to expand our design team a little so. And I started to understand as you grow and your infrastructure builds and what have you, there's, you know, there's other people involved, and I would get a little bit more experienced. But But yeah, I still plan to stay, you know, and involved in the design aspect. And that was definitely something that was that was allowed to get, you know, get involved in the first season. Scott, I want to get into some of the collaborations that you've done. But before we get into that, I've got to ask you about some media training that footballers get because it's always played on my mind that I feel like you mentioned yourself that you you kind of front of the you're the frontman of the band, so to speak, because you've had some of the training and you can deal with questions being thrown at you. Now, I have a theory that media training came in for footballers around about the time when Gaza was interviewed about what he thinks of Norway for the World Cup. And his response, which you can't repeat on here, that just went by everybody else goes right now we have to sign off what everyone says we have to we have to vet it, we have to vet all the questions before these guys get asked, has has it become a lot more strict with what what journalists can ask footballers, you know, and what, like people, you know, come to the table with in terms of questions, you get some guarded questions a lot of the time. Yeah, I think I think it has. I think it has changed slightly. I don't think it's so you know, so open, I think people are a little bit more wise. Now, I think with the the power that media has, and you know, if you if you sort of say the wrong thing, or you know, you answer a question in a manner that, you know, can be maybe quite triggering or wherever, you know how fast that then travels. So, yeah, I think, yes, need some of the journalists does, there's almost prior agreements, if you like, at times, they say, okay, we're gonna ask these types of questions. You're not you're not for us, these types of questions, etc, etc. So there's a little bit of an agreement that, you know, before an interview starts, but you can, you know, people will try and try and blindside you imagine, right, yeah. I mean, that you've had the courage to see it. Now, you see that you do see that they will throw in a question and, you know, it's then up to that person to try and handle that, as best they can. Some people will just say straight up. No, I'm not answering the question. But it's always better if you can, you know, be as open and I suppose live out kind of, you know, landing this off in any trouble or upsetting anybody with, with your, your answers. So, I mean, you had a career of 17 years. So you must have grown up in the years of the Wild West when it comes to journalism and people asking you anything and everything, and being allowed to do that as well. We had a Calum chambers on here a couple of years ago. And I interviewed him about the New England kit that was coming out. And I remember having to send about 20 questions off very, very insignificant questions about a football kit and the PR people came back and scratched out 18 questions and I was allowed to us to this is gonna be the fun interview that I've been looking forward to and it was it was a really nice guy. But obviously, there's only so much he is allowed to say. So yeah, I'm always intrigued with what they're trying to screw you up on what exactly is, you know, when you sit down for media training day, what it is that they throw at you? Yeah, it's just I mean, I've never actually sat and had media training. I know that something that, in terms of that being a structure that players will, will go through and sift through. I think that's coming a bit later. And also, I think it's a lot of the bigger clubs that have obviously have a lot more Limelight and a lot more. interviews and whatnot. What Yeah, we'll travel a lot further, and there's a lot more interest around those particular players. So I've kind of just sort of learned from experience, I suppose, and just then, you know, not that I've had a bad interview, but I think, yeah, this might be just that. Yeah. Yeah. It's just the case of, I think just having that kind of a little bit of social awareness, I think goes a long way when you're doing an interview, you know, and just kind of just trying to pre, okay, if the answer like this, what are the implications going to be what what are the, you know, how are they going to put this on the front page of a paper? And I think that's the main thing, just having that little bit of social awareness, I think, kind of goes a long way. Yeah, no, I agree. I went off the grass. Thanks, Scott, for indulging me, let's get back to area code. No problem. Talk to me about some of the collaborations that we touched upon, they're gone free, for example, what is gone free? And why are these collaborations important to you? So like I said, when we, when we first established a brand, these were things that we really wanted to act on. So go on three, just outside the car in Senegal, one of the founders, his heritage is Senegalese. So he had a he had a sight in mind from the get go, that you'd like to look at seeing if we can have some improvement and have some impact there. So as a small school, we started off with installing some toilets, and then didn't actually have any toilets, believe it or not, it's just outside of the the Capitol. So they call it the bush. So it's, it's a school of very humble means, you know, they are doing very, very, very basic stuff. So yeah, so we went in and decided to instal some toilets, first and foremost, and proper working toilets, and then electricity, and then the electricity. And then we went on to build a well, so they could have running water. And then we are just at phase four, now where we're looking at, we just started a garden, so they could start to grow, whatever. Now they've got the well, because sometimes they irrigate irrigation system, and they can start to grow their own food, they're on site, which is something also which is quite empowering for the kids to get involved in. And then finally, we're looking at installing some solar panels, so that they can be self sufficient. So they're hooked up with electricity from the grid, but that that comes with its problems as well in certain parts of certain parts of seminar. So we're looking at the solar panels next, to make themselves make themselves self sufficient. And it also benefit the community in that in that area as well. And it will have a bit of a further reach than just the school. So, so yeah, that was that was where we started. And that was obviously the first collaboration. We're probably three quarters of the way through that kind of that collaboration in terms of what we saw as a as a goal. You know, yeah, it's been it's been incredible. I mean, I was fortunate enough to go to the school two years ago. And we did have plans to go again, but with the travel complications with COVID has been quite difficult. But we I've got guys on the ground now made some really good, you know, really good contacts. And like I said off, one of our founders is, he's actually got family local in the car so they can go and check up on the works. Yeah, to make sure because again, we want to make sure and document everything so that we could really, you know, make sure what what we're setting out to to be achieved, you know, is being done and, and also create that reassurance for people that are, you know, purchasing clothes and following the brand. They can see, you know, what's happening, you know, they can see the journey as well. Yeah, that's it. And that's where the whole idea of becoming an area code member. Signing up and becoming a members, you get that you get access to that you can see, you get regular updates, you can see what's happening. With the social missions, if you like and the collaborations you can see, you know, what's being installed and the progress being made on the sites. And off the back of that we'd like to create the area code community, we're just looking at setting up a telegram group so that people can actually bounce ideas around as well. So we want to kind of almost create a movement really where, yes, we're all sort of bound together by the brand and the clothing while the people have seen the clothing somewhere, or they've purchased a piece of clothing. But there's also a community of, of people that are interested in the social missions, and they want some type of input, they might have suggestions on things we could potentially do in the future. You know, so that's, that was kind of the idea behind creating that area called community. I really like the idea of having something specific. So is it on your site, you have like 15% of the 15% of like, when you buy a garment, this is what we're going to be putting towards this movement, yes, benefit. Whereas I know a lot of even a lot of friends that have brands, they have like a kind of this opaque will give 10% to name your awareness, you know, I mean, but yeah, it's commendable, because I'm not doing anything so 10% better than what I'm doing. But it's still Yeah, it doesn't have something that you can hang your coat on. Whereas what you're doing has something that you can visualise it's, it's palpable in a way. Yeah, that's it. And we thought that was really important to say, look, you know, it's a, it's a good percentage of the profits. And it's fixed. So, you know, this is, this is what it is, there's no, you know, that's not to be compromised. Again, have it so it's transparent. And, and we can, you know, we're accountable for that, you know, we want it to be open so that people can say, Well, okay, I'm actually really interested to see where the 15% is going. Where's that being spent? You know, how is that being put to use? So we want it to be super transparent with all of that. You know, so people can people can kind of have faith in in random from what it's doing. Could you and here's here's a question that I'll blindsides. You have a Scott, could you reach out to any Senegalese footballs? I mean, obviously, the one that comes to mind is Sergio Manny. I mean, he's known for his, his his humanitarian ism. I mean, he walked around with a cracked iPhone for half a year, because he just fear now why pay for a new iPhone when I can come back and give this to my community back home? Are there any kind of like footballers raised from from their community that have done well, they could kind of pay it back as well that you could lean on? Yeah, definitely. There are there are, you know, there are people that we could we could reach out to, which is, which is definitely something that's on the radar for us. But we are quite, you know, we're quite sort of, you know, the first sight is, is in the core of Senegal, but we're, you know, we're not sort of limited to that, you know, we are we actually have a football tournament coming up in Ghana. And we've just put together the 10th to the 12th of August. Where again, we wanted to put something together is actually sponsored by to two footballers. So we wanted to put this tournament together juvenile tournament where As 13th, on the 13th, on the 15th, and 17th, we've got some scouts come in from Sweden, to come in, to come in to come and watch, to hopefully try to give some of the, you know, the young guys their opportunity to go in, you know, have a career in the game, and, you know, make make something from that from the talent, you know, so yeah, so there's no, it's not sort of limited, and it's definitely something like this, it's definitely something that we would look to start reaching out to different to different people, as the as we start to raise more brand awareness. And I think the other thing is, well, is the, is the kind of the proof what we like to do, it's nice to do before, before you ask, I have this philosophy, you know, you do you do something first and then So, for us, you know, we'd like to kind of really sort of show, okay, this is, this is what we do. And these are the things we've been able to achieve. Now with the help of x person or this person, you know, we can now go on to really scale this, this thing and take it to, you know, different different parts of the world and do different different sorts of things. So, but yeah, that sort of long winded answer to your question really, is definitely we can we can reach out to, to different, you know, athletes, you know, musicians, people that have, you know, influence in, in their communities. You know, definitely be on our radar. How do we get to watch the football tournament, Scott, or can we? So, yeah, so we're working on it being broadcasted. So just waiting on the details for that, and how valuable that is, but we are working hard on, on trying to have that, that broadcasted so that it can, can be watched can be streamed. So now the euros is over. I gotta tell you, I mean, this weird. Yeah, you're struggling. Nothing is left you feeling like you just sold that little bit short, as well. And I'm listening to the podcast. So the transfer news, what's going on right now? I mean, this might go out in a week or two, but that doesn't feel like there's any clubs doing any movement right now. I mean, Liverpool did it early weekend. I mean, I guess there's a couple of things getting touted about but I wonder if we're just in this little market now where we're waiting for one heavy here to do a big move, and then all the other clubs will kind of drop into place. Yeah, I think so. And I think it's the type of thing because we have had, you know, the your roles and you know, corporate America, it kind of does push things back a little bit, because it's almost like, the season, it's just finished. So, you know, I know, as preseason starting to kick in, people will start to make some more moves, because a lot of managers will look at their squads, and they'll be able to see in friendly games. Okay, we're a little bit short here, we could do with, you know, this person, or we could do with that person. So, you know, hopefully start to see some movement. I don't know whether the, you know, the times as well, that we're in is slow things up a little bit, which I imagine it has, especially for some of the clubs a little bit further down the chain. You know, I think it's starting to really make it make it difficult. I know, there's a lot of talk about squad size is shrinking. So So yeah, but I think you're right, I think, you know, might need one or two big moves to really kind of get the wheels, the wheels moving and we're starting to see some action. I think we need to kind of gauge what the bellwether is in terms of what players are worth in today's current market. Because I mean, you might say, hypothetically, grealish, could be worth 150 million, but until somebody makes a move on, say, Harry Kane, and then we go, Well, now we know what hurricanes were, if we can tell you what jQuery is worth, or now we know how much psds got to spend, even though they've had no one in the stadiums for a year. We know how much x and y is going to spend on on such and such a player. So it's just I feel like Like I said, I kind of need this football tournament of yours to happen now. Because I'm in a dark place where there's nothing going on right now. There's not enough going on. I understand and we definitely keep you keep you updated when we've got the we've got the broadcast in format in place. I look forward to seeing that well. Area hyphen code.com has place that I mentioned all the updates will come in That's a website, you can check out some of the garments as well. And also Scott, you're on Instagram as well and Mr. Golden. And if people want to keep track of you, and and see what you're doing out there, then I imagine that'd be a good place to stop by as a retired footballer, how do you now monitor your own fitness? So like, I don't imagine you have to be Matt sharp every weekend. But there must be an hour like a point in your life where you go, Well, I don't really want to kind of have my fitness drop off the face of a cliff. So how do you approach fitness now, at this point in your career, so now it's just about keeping a good, a good base of fitness. So I still, you know, I still go to the gym three, four times a week. But it is a different type of fitness now, because I'm not needing to play 90 minutes of football. So you know, I don't need to do the level of running that I would, I would have done while I was playing, you know, because I know many needing to be on a treadmill for 20 minutes, 30 minutes, nice enough. So I've kind of looked at more longevity now. So yoga mobility, sort of a core strength as opposed to super, super explosive power, you know, high level of endurance, which is probably, you know, it's still good to test and test myself and still have that, I think you'll always I think as a as a competitor, you always have something in life, even if I started off with five press ups today, tomorrow, I'd want to do six, and then the next day you want to do 10. And then the next because you just have that progressive. I think you just have that progressive nature. But competitive, even if it's just with yourself is still competitive, it's like you can't help it. But yeah, I just look at keeping a good base now. And also, remembering that my body's taken a pound in for 17 years. So we're trying to balance, keeping fit, but also making sure I'm on now resting, so that you know, I'm not overworking myself and continuously pounding on the same joints. And, you know, so I try and switch a lot of the exercises. Now if I can jump on a bike, instead of some, some so many miles running, you know, is better, this is less impact, or if I can, you know, go for a swim instead. So still get in, you know, still getting the heart rate up, and it's still open your lungs, but it's not so much of an impact on the body. You know, so that's kind of the space I'm in at the moment, I definitely think I will probably pick up something, you know, whether it be you know, cycling, you know, a different sport and take it a little bit more seriously. Whether it's, you know, boxing or wherever it is or not. So we're gonna start going into bouts and brave preferred one, right, Andrew Flynn off, it does seem like a lot. Yeah. That's, that's it, I think it's just sometimes it's still nice to have that, you know, something that you can kind of pull yourself into a little bit and it's enjoyable. And, you know, it keeps you fit, as well, because I know, speaking to the athletes that have retired, the gym can be a little bit repetitive after a while. So some of them will pick up a different kind of hobby, like I said, like cycling or you know, like, you know, a martial art or, or something like that to to keep themselves stimulated and the brain active also, because you're learning something new at the same time. Where did you play on the field? Scott? I was a left back, left wing left wing back. So you would have been on the field pretty much for the full night of most games, right? Because you don't really get the left backs, like the back for typically stay on the field. I mean, is that right? Yeah, majority majority of the time he stay on the field. Yeah. And that says some severe tactical change and you know, we changed into a back three or you know, we're losing the game and we want to just we want to put you know, taller players on the pitch or whatever it is recipes, but yeah, generally stay on the on the pitch for the course of the game. So you've had 17 years at the top fly and you've been running pretty much for 17 years straight in every game. Yeah. It's a lot. You know, you can easily especially when you know when you're playing when you can easily 11 12k word sometimes and again, so when sometimes you might have two games a week, so within a month, you could easily be racking up, you know, a lot of a lot, you need to be pushing 100 100k trees some months. So, yeah, it can get quite intense and wanting to take that into consideration is quite taxing on the body. So, you know, so like I said, Now I'm just mindful of making sure that given those you know, join something's arrest on looking at more long term, okay, making sure my mobility is good as football as we can be all about speed and power and agility, but sometimes mobility, you know, flexibility, we neglect that a little bit, you know, probably don't do as much yoga as we should do as much stretching as we should do and those types of things because you know, we tend to lean more towards the stuff that we think that we think is going to have a bigger impact on a Saturday in the 90 minutes as opposed to you know, longevity inducing injury and those types of things so which is a space I'm in now because obviously like I said, I don't need to play 90 minutes of football but I want to be able to be you know, relatively supple on my body function well for a long period of time, which I know comes from strength and mobility. So that's an arsenal so why am I at the minute is an insane physician the wing back because you for anyone that's not played football, I've played football just for fun, and I've I've been stuck in wingback a few times and it just absolutely kills you because you got to make the runs forward you got to get into those spaces you got to drift defenders away so the other people you know, take defenders out of the game as it were with your runs. And then as soon as it all goes pear shaped you've got to peg it back and make sure that no one's doing any damage at the other end. I mean anyone that wants to see what true fitness is take a look at Andy Robertson in a game of football because he absolutely creamed every game. I mean he was he played every game for Liverpool last season, then go straight to the euros plays for Scotland and come straight back to preseason training. And I think it was Jose Marino that said I'm just tired of looking at this kid I think he's playing against Chelsea when we beat Chelsea one day guys, I don't want to see that guy ever again because he just got knackered looking at it but that is just a position when you think like the strikers do get a lot of the glory a lot of time midfield a lot of column inches are the people that do the real running are the wing backs. Definitely the you know the the engine when wingbacks midfield players midfield players the engine room that they might not cover as much of the ground in terms of just straight line running your wing backs in your fullbacks the modern day fullback any way you can you can easily rack up some some miles you know you're responsible for creating goals crossing you know putting in crosses creating opportunities, but you're still a defender so if all goes pear shaped you're still expected to be able to define your posts and get in get back and cover some offs and whatnot as well so it's a little bit unforgiving so you can imagine just watching something like on the robots and what the the the impact is on your body. You know is is is taxing and also I like to how it's changed slightly now where defenders I guess this was always the case being a unit but they celebrate a great defensive move now like they've scored a goal you see the Italians in the euros when they pull off an amazing block or they know that they stopped to go in there in the in the game with that they were going to huddle they Pat each other on the gas and they go that was as good as score and a go and you can see them over and celebrate a great defensively. But that's changed now I think as well do you think? Yeah, definitely. And I think I always used to talk about this with my teammates because I used to always I used to like when American football in American football. When someone makes a tackle they will go wild is literally like they've like they've they've attached and I and I always used to say years ago like that's an amazing thing that they will all celebrate something like that because it is as important you know, if you're making a last ditch tackle or you you make a block on the line that is as important as scoring a goal because those types of things will win and lose your game as well as scoring a goal. So yeah, definitely. I think that's that's the Italians have always done it. I think they was really taken a lot of pride in in defending You know the Dark Arts they've got all the different shots in the book for for defending and and they take real pride in that but yeah you are starting to see defending being applauded because it is on defenders athletes now in UC called Walker the amount of times you come sweet help or Maguire or stones when it breaks down, you know, the defenders athletes now as well and utilising that athleticism to stop goals as opposed to you know create in them which we which we see so often so so yeah, it's fine to start to change and I think defending is becoming you know people do are still excited about attacking but defending is becoming its own thing. I reckon. It's its own thing. Yeah, a bit sexy, I reckon as well. I mean, yeah, bring it definitely. Oh, you see the likes of Trent Alexander Arnold. I mean, he's, he's like one of the biggest playmakers for Liverpool now with the crosses and the stuff that he can do. You know, he's being touted as the next Gerald, the future Skipper of Liverpool, like the kids 20. Whatever. 21 maybe, but he is kind of revolutionising that position. A bit like Robertson on the left is seeing a train to 100%. Scott, I'm going to I could talk football and Liverpool all day, if you can probably imagine, but appreciate you got a life to lead. I did have one last thing I wanted to throw by with. With regards to football, when we're talking about the Italians and euros for example. I always thought penalties is just a very cruel way to decide any kind of game. And it's always a bit of a non event, in terms of, you've never really felt like you won the game. So you've and you haven't won the game, you've just kind of won the shootout. And there's I don't know if there's always like a dead feeling for players at the end of that as well. My point is, what if they actually did the penalties before the game and said, Look, in case this goes to penalties, we're gonna have to penalties before and so that people don't feel like when they miss the last kick of the game, then they have to now kind of face up to every article on social media, would you be in favour of having like a panel issue app before the game and then playing the game out? And then if it does end up in a drawer after 120 minutes, and they kind of count the penalties that they did before the first whistle? Yeah, yeah. Definitely. It comes with its positives and negatives. I think if you won the penalty competition, I feel like that, that might change the course of the game slightly, because almost like you're won a lot. So you know, if we just don't concede that we gone with bravas. You can you can get sometimes when when, again, you know, teams will really go for it. Because they don't necessarily. Sometimes you might have one team that's happier to go to penalties. But I don't think neither side being in football, I've not been in any, in any team. That's happy to take penalties. You get good tenant seekers and lots of dependency, because but any nobody really wants it to go to penalties when you plan. So, yeah, I think it's a difficult one, you know, I suppose you could it could be done? Or could you just play a game with no penalties and go right, we're gonna just if it goes on for three hours, just whoever scores Yeah, I think that's an option. I know, you know, a good friend of mine is a is a real basketball enthusiasts. And he is he says, he can understand things. And in basketball, we just keep going until until that somebody, you know, they score or, like, that's it, we just keep going another another, another. Another piece of time, economic peace time, we'll just keep going until there's a winner. You could be I think that probably might be an option with with football is so difficult, because like you said the penalties are almost like a competition in that, you know, on their own because as a footballer, you could go from months and months and months and months without taking the penalty months. You do everything else in the game. But you don't, you don't you actually don't take a penalty because if there is a penalty, there's normally one or two delegated penalty takers. And that's it. So it is it's not nowhere near a true reflection of you know, ability and all this thing was better because they want on penalties, not you know, not always in literally a competition itself. And that's why you saw the changes You know, when you rush it, and that's why these changes were made because they are. It's almost like, okay, Lazarus is a new competition law. So these are the best guys that we've got in the base of the back of the train and specialism. Why do these guys in the car for this competition? Because that's, that's how it's looking. So it's a little time now where I was before it used to be we get to the end, right? He wants to take one. So I'm putting on some shrinkage. Which is, which is fair enough? Because, you know, this is not it is not easy and is a difficult and like I said, it's, it's not easy because one because you know, there's big pressure. And to it's because you're doing something that you're generally not that if you said to the sun house or as a heading competition, however many will, you know, it'd be a different story, you know, they would say, Yeah, no problem. I do it, because this is something that I do all the time. But when it's penalties is not something that's you don't do this often, you know, any doing this, you only start practising it if it's a competition, so those loads with loads and loads of the gun all season, not really taking any penalties. And then because there's a competition now I'm just trying to start practising the penalties while the competitions go in, in train and and what have you, I still know it can't make up for the fact that you might have gone all season by either without taking any penalties. It's all in Florida. That's crazy. This is it. This is it, you're going and stepping up and doing something that's unfamiliar. So that's why is is a difficult way to end. And competitions. Whether it will stay? I think so at the moment, because it's probably the easiest way to get it to get it done. Because like I said, you could continue on but how long does it How long? Is it a wonderful burn? Yeah, exactly. Well, still, people are sneaking a stamp. I don't know how you whether you you know, put some type of golden goal. You know, you have the extra time or just like the 15 minutes of extra time. 15 minutes of golden goal. I think next on target, I don't know, something else, you know, to try and to try and sort of finish it in a more suppose more realistic football game type situation? Yeah. I always for years, crazy that you're talking about basketball that we don't do what the Americans do in football and basketball. Their side is that they stop the clock when it goes out of play. Right? So they literally just go right, that's it. And so you don't have people practising the Dark Arts like the Italians can do where they fold the ground in extra time crushing it? Yes, or limb and go. That's it. You have a minute off the five minutes that we've got an extra time. Yeah. Have you ever figured that out? Why we don't just stop the clock? Yeah, I think that's something that's so easy to do. So rather than having the minutes go up, and everybody argues about the minutes, and I think it's relatively easy, just yeah, I think you just have somebody else, like, he doesn't need to be the referee. And on Sunday, we've got all this tech on what Not now, I think every time that the ball goes out, it's an automated, automated thing. That you, you know, wants to either connect on there can even be a clock. So even like basketball, you could have a clock. Yeah. And, you know, in a stadium or whatever, so everybody can see, you know, we've got three minutes left, and it's three minutes. You know, and this is it. Once it's three minutes done. That's it, you know, because we've clocked the time, it's accurate, because the playing time is it's calculated properly. I know that for some games will be long, but there's some teams that don't keep the ball in play. So that might go on a little bit as a few teams that that might end up playing some longer game. But yeah, that would be a more accurate, scientific way of doing it. Definitely like basketball. So there's no argument we've played 15 minutes in this quarter. And we've played exactly 15 minutes. I think that'd be much better, and also a bit more exciting and helpful for the players as well, right? Because you sometimes see the players take short corners, even though we're in the fifth minute of extra time, when everyone's screaming get it in the mixer and all this sort of stuff and like players are just kind of kicking around not really knowing what you know, no kind of time awareness which is understandable. But once they see it on the big teleprompter, you know, they got 10 seconds left then boom, send the keeper up. Get it in. Yeah, you definitely see some some excitement because you know, what you see with shot clocks and stuff that basketball we you know, on the buzzer the amount of stuff you see on the buzzer, you can go on YouTube and type buzzer shots and it's a lot What people what people would what people do when you know they take a shot on the England never do because you got nothing to lose. And you probably see some cool stuff online football as well see if they did, they did bring something. I'm going there now buzzer clock on YouTube. That's what I'm going to basketball as a club. Scott, I am going to finally let you go. Thanks so much for indulging all my little silly questions and talking about area code and all the important stuff that you're doing out there in Senegal as well. Once again, the website area hyphen. co.com is the place where you can get involved have a look at the membership on the website, but more importantly, have a look at some of the clothes which are also great and and take your pick from some of the garments. In the meantime, thank you, Scott. Thanks for your time. problem at all. How about that? As you can imagine, I could have talked to Scott for hours. For Scott it probably felt like I did. Thank you, Scott. And thank you all for listening again that their website is area hyphen co.com. I encourage you to go check that out and also the show notes over at menswear style. That's a social handle the website menswear store.co.uk where we put all the articles lifestyle travel football included, so go check that out when you get time. In the meantime, if you want to come on the show, tell us about your journey and your brand then why not email us here at info at menswear. style.co Uk Okay, thanks for listening. Until next time,