The Menswear Style Podcast

Jamie Lundy, CEO at 7L (SEVEN LAYER)

July 19, 2021 Menswear Style Episode 131
The Menswear Style Podcast
Jamie Lundy, CEO at 7L (SEVEN LAYER)
Chapters
The Menswear Style Podcast
Jamie Lundy, CEO at 7L (SEVEN LAYER)
Jul 19, 2021 Episode 131
Menswear Style

7L is a functional-first performance brand that manages to fuse fashion with function and performance with style. Their highly technical products harness a combination of innovative design, high-performance fabrics and technically advanced manufacturing creating luxury products that not only look great, but are built to last a lifetime.

In this episode of the MenswearStyle Podcast we interview Jamie Lundy, CEO at 7L about the founding story of the brand which began in 2015 using Swiss technical fabrics and inspired by the US military's seven layer system concept. The brand was well received across the UK and in 2016 Jamie joined the company leaving behind a career in engineering. Jamie was recovering from depression and decided to take up photography as a hobby which is what first led him to 7L . He invested heavily in the brand and relocated the company back to Manchester and made use of local manufacturing. Our host Peter Brooker and Jamie also talk about British manufacturing, vintage military, product testing, and garment tech.

Whilst we have your attention, be sure to sign up to our daily MenswearStyle newsletter here. We promise to only send you the good stuff.



Show Notes Transcript

7L is a functional-first performance brand that manages to fuse fashion with function and performance with style. Their highly technical products harness a combination of innovative design, high-performance fabrics and technically advanced manufacturing creating luxury products that not only look great, but are built to last a lifetime.

In this episode of the MenswearStyle Podcast we interview Jamie Lundy, CEO at 7L about the founding story of the brand which began in 2015 using Swiss technical fabrics and inspired by the US military's seven layer system concept. The brand was well received across the UK and in 2016 Jamie joined the company leaving behind a career in engineering. Jamie was recovering from depression and decided to take up photography as a hobby which is what first led him to 7L . He invested heavily in the brand and relocated the company back to Manchester and made use of local manufacturing. Our host Peter Brooker and Jamie also talk about British manufacturing, vintage military, product testing, and garment tech.

Whilst we have your attention, be sure to sign up to our daily MenswearStyle newsletter here. We promise to only send you the good stuff.



Unknown:

Hello, and welcome to another episode of The menswear style podcast. I'm your host Pete Brooker. Today I'm talking to Jamie Lundy, who is the founder, CEO and creative director of seven layer. And seven layer is a functional first performance brand that manages diffuse fashion with function and performance with style. They're highly technical products harness a combination of innovative design, high performance fabrics, and technically advanced manufacturing, creating luxury products that not only look great, but are built to last a lifetime. And here is Jamie to introduce the brand in his own words. The brand initially was founded in 2015 by a designer called Dominic Stansfield, who at the time worked for a company in China ktc ktc, at the time on, still are one of the best factories in the world, just excuse the siren going past. Life getting in the way. Yeah, so they, they are renowned as one of the best factories in the world at doing manufacturing, technical outerwear. So Dominic worked for them. And at the time, they were working with a company called Shahla in Switzerland, and shallow, you know, make the best fabrics in the world, stunning fabrics, very expensive. But you know, very technical fabrics, very luxurious fabrics. And so they had a close connection with ktc. And they were looking at doing what the other concept of the what the US military use, which is a seven layer system. So that's basically you know, the the, the soldiers in the US would have a kickback, it used to be so I think it'd be 22 layers. And they've reduced it down to seven layers because of technology, because of intelligent fabrics, manufacturing got, you know, better and we started doing laser cut machines. So the whole sort of concept of the kickback came down to seven layers, and starting from layer one through which was a base layer, which could be you know, your T shirts, short, long John's type of thing all the way up to an arctic cold layer, which is layer seven, and everything in between. So, dominant work for ktc and started to develop that seven layer concept on dominant called itself now. He sort of designed the logo, they got it trademarked, etc, etc. And then, so it was in its very early stages, very, you know, its infancy of the business. And they launched the A w 16. collection in, in the UK. And it did really, really well it was really well received. Everybody loved the concept of it. And the jackets were very high spec, because obviously Dominic could work in the factory ktc he was surrounded by the top trims in the world, the top fabrics in the world. And so he really could create an invent anything you wanted. And so that when they launched the AWS 16 collection, lots of retailers got hold of it, you know, and love loved the concept of it. But the problem was, was there was no really business foundation to discipline L and Dominic had a friend over in the UK. And between the two of them, sort of tried to start up a bit of a business with someone else. And approached me quite early on to see if I would be willing to invest in the company. I've just come from a 20 year career 25 year career in engineering, and I'm sort of retired from engineering because as we sold off on the business, me my dad, my brother, what kind of engineering so I was we were initially involved in design and building petrochemical plants. Many, many moons ago about 15 years ago and then we got we diversified into rail. So me and my brother to design lots of structures and superstructures. You know, when you instal on the railway in 1999 2000, I was actually part of the rail track core design team that developed the West Coast signal gantry for Richard Branson's trains to 25 mile an hour. So obviously when that that initial design came out on that railtrack wanted to try and do that and the whole infrastructure from Manchester all the way down to London had to change because they had to, you know get more capacity on the railway. I changed it from two trucks to four trucks, which meant that everything that went over the railway had to be changed, you know, all new specifications for 125 mile an hour trains have to be developed. for 2015 years I was on the road as a construction manager, project director from Manchester to London, upgrade in the West Coast with massive railway structures and signal gantries. We've got a lot to thank you for Jamie, especially people that want to do that commute, right? Yeah, I mean, I was actually the last I was the engineer on the job that we moved the last signal in between all the tracks to allow Richard Branson to run all four lines with panda Leno's. Which is, yeah, that's actually a pretty cool legacy. Yeah, well, seeing the trains, you know, you're opening the lines and seeing the trains run again, it was, you know, after so many years of doing what we're doing, it was good. But it ended up in London. I ended up doing Thameslink new signalling, I went over to red in and built but to help build the signalling and electrification at Red in station, and then back over to Thameslink again, to do key output to we did receive rail Award for Most Outstanding Individual project there as well. And then, you know, being on the road for so long, and being away from wife and kids and things like that depression, you know, taking a hold of me without, without knowing. I mean, I'd suffered from depression when I was 22. And then, you know, over a 20 year career, I didn't realise that it sort of started to creep up again. And I started to nosedive pretty quick, until the point where I was back home, in a bit of therapy, and when we decided as a family run business to sort of call it a day because I was sort of burnt out. My dad was, you know, the age of retirement for 65. My brother was away from his kids as well. And we just thought, Well, you know, we've built this amazing brand now. We've all done our innings, let's say, let's, let's retire my dad, and let's try something else. So yeah, I think what am I now 43, stores 38, when we sold from the business, and then from the depression, I went to a local while I was I was put on medication and whatnot, and then went to a local GP to my doctor and just said, you know, after six months of being on medication, it's just not working. It's just not, you know, I can't really, I can't find happiness anywhere. And he just sort of said, you know, have you ever tried photography? And I was like, Well, yeah, I used to photograph the kids on holiday and stuff. And he said, Well, we'll try it because it you know, it gets you outdoors. Get your creative mind, thinking. Just give it a go. So that's what I did. And that's when an old colleague of mine, an old friend of mine, that used to do gymnastics with approached me to photograph the products for 700. Wow. Okay. So I was like, that's, that's the first time I've ever seen, you know, the fabrics of Southern outlaw these intelligent fabrics from shaula. And to be honest, I mean, it was very, very new in the industry as well. So like talking 2016, it was way back. And I was I was really impressed. I was like, because I was from the manufacturing background, and engineering background. I was just like, well, these are amazing, you know, what are these five things? Yeah. Sounds like you got you got a good appreciation for design. Yeah. Like me, I like things at work. And I like things that have a real good functionality. And so yeah, I think it sounds like it did resonate with you attention to detail. I was I was really interested in how the fabrics worked. The technology behind them, you know, the geeky stuff, I found really interesting. So I did the product photography for the guys. And then you know, from there was basically I was looking for something else that to get my teeth into and invest in probably not what I've been doing on the railway for years because it's unsociable hours and working every you know, all the weekends and working I think I did 12 Christmas days, in the 15 years on the railway. So it's quite 12 Christmas days not seeing the kids and all that sort of stuff. So I thought right, you know, let's let's get into the fashion world. And let's see what this intelligent fabrics is all about. And I accepted the challenge with the guys. I'm starting to invest heavily into the brand. So for about four years now. Excuse the tractors going past Yeah. It's actually like being in my mom's garden. I'm getting a really nice nostalgic sound, it's a great panorama. To do that. I wanted to bring it back to Manchester because you know, to be able to control the business that was over in China or Hong Kong at the time. Just you know, we tried it for a while but the the You know the difference in timescales, trying to get hold of our designer Don, when he was in China, you know, we've proven hard work. So Don decided to stay in Hong Kong and stay with ktc, I brought the brand back home to Manchester and wanted to start manufacturing, like we'd always done with my family business and start manufacturing more in Manchester. You know, bringing a bit more of natural fabrics into the range and sort of staying 100% synthetic, we wanted to bring some more sort of Cotton's into the range. Manufacturing locally, really and using the resource that we have around us in Manchester. I mean, yeah, the cotton is of the world. So it's right. Yeah, yeah. original place back. You know what, why can't we do it back here? And a lot of people say no, no, that technology is gone. No, you can't do that anymore. No, we don't do seam taping anymore. When I was like, Why? You know, you know, I mean, the man on the moon these days. Why can't we? We start manufacturing back. Private white, just down the road from you are doing it. So yeah, I mean, I don't watch Mike's doll now. They're developing same type jacket for to the bottom. Okay. Yeah. So for the seam taped jacket, we were the accepted the challenge of trying to do some some stuff for us, which is amazing. And Cooper and storebrand. We've also got cooks in club working for us and Blackburn, they're doing a lot of our products as well. Now. Holly Stevenson, the fabric company in Dundee, they're supplying a lot by fabrics got British millerain in Rochdale, that are supplying a lot of the fabric. So we're not just doing our synthetic sort of China thing. Now we're also doing I mean, we say giant, I mean, the the best in the world of what they do, you know, the techniques that they've got over there far outweighs what we've got here. Because, you know, years and years ago, we sold our, our technology to China, you know, so we're now trying to get it back. That's still the best thing to do. So our technical outerwear pieces are stored on in China. A lot of our layers, one, two, layer four, which is our base layers, our mid layers, warm layers, as we call them. And our field layers are done in the UK, in Britain made in Britain. Okay. So it's kind of like a hybrid, basically, of the fabrics coming together. But yeah, manufactured in China as well, the latest five to seven, which the intelligent fabrics and the complex manufacturing are done in China. Because they've, you know, they're using laser cut machines, and all sorts of they're still done over there. A lot of our natural stuff now is done in the UK. Awesome. And, yeah, I mean, it's not just outerwear jackets that you do as well. You've do Parkers and and hoodies and stuff like that. And you've you've also got some new releases that have just come out in April. Can you touch upon that with what people can find in the latest collection? Yeah, the origin system that came out last October was obviously more geared towards out, you know, the cold, we did lock down jackets and whatnot, but the MTP system, we were looking for inspiration. And I've always loved as a kid playing with toy soldiers, you know, in the garden, I'm a 90s kid getting, you know, so I was inspired by the berghaus jackets of old and all that sort of stuff, oasis. And, you know, that's the era I grew up in. And I've always loved vintage military was been a collector of vintage military. I mean, I've got a, I've got an American truck in my garden, for God's sake, you know, so, you know, that sort of started to inspire the way the brand started to look really in the direction it was, was taken because it was originally a very Asian brand, but it was more sort of marketed towards the younger generation. So you have to be sort of, I'd say 18 to 22 to wear some of the gear and I was like, that's a very niche market. Why can't we open the age range for everybody you know, so we're just so being so niche and you're gonna have to be you know, paint stone and and really slim and well toned to wear archaea? Why can't we just open up the the normal bloke and wear our gear as well. So the MTP system sort of focused a lot on that and we made the gear a little bit bigger. So so you know, so we didn't, we're not doing the Italian size as well. We're in a two XL, but really, we're a medium. Right? Okay, you know, a medium in the UK is a medium now. If it's a medium guy or a large guy, etc. So we started off with that and sizing was a big thing for us to try and get right. We've got a great team of garment techs behind us do a wonderful job. They're very experienced, ladies, for ladies that sort of work from the berghaus of all so very good at what they do. We started to develop the damtp system which was based off the camo from the British military. So the colours of the camo in the British military started to inspire the quality of the collection. And I just thought after the pandemic, everybody would, would want to stay safe this year with colours and and sort of so we muted them and we had sort of browns and greens. You know, everything we did a T shirt I've gotten now this the sky blue one looks great. It's got the colour of the sky. So it was it was like a mirror system stroke, British forces system, we looked at the American camo as well. So we had some pinks and things in there. But we sort of decided to just go with the British sort of colours, keep it very grounded. You're doing most of the sites and you're doing most of the designing yourself now or bringing a lot of the ideas to the table yourself. Yeah, we do everything in house. So I I drive the creative direction of which, yep, what we're going to do and what sort of theme we're going to do and why we're going to do it. I have an amazing outerwear designer in Chris Vendrell that actually came from Mike's dollar private wealth, Cooper instal burn, he private White's he I went to see him for some advice, because I needed some designers on board. And he actually gave me Chris's name. About two years ago, I got in touch with Chris, and then we've never looked back. So between the two, where they've you know, between the two of us, we are seven out. Right? I come up with crazy ideas. And you mix them up. Really? How do you go about your inspiration and your your research, as it were, I mean, you've got a research or release military backgrounds mean, like, for example, the cold weather system that you had, from the 80s that was introduced? How do you kind of go about unearthing all of this stuff from the past? Well, I did. I mean, the bronze only been properly going since about October last year, when we developed when we launched the origin system. Not a lot of people have really heard about us since then. But before then, sorry, but you know, three years before, was the research time. So I put a lot of work into, you know, reading about the US military, because the seven layer systems based off originally the US military, but now it can be any sort of military that we vintage military, but if we're like a pocket, we'll use it. So I started collecting, you know, I've got 500 vintage military jackets now, which might at South Africa before, but these are the rarest pieces of military bits and bobs you can get. So I've got a great dealer, shout out to Saunders in Canada, he sort of sources all the military bits for us. And then says, I've got an amazing piece, would you like it? And then I'd say yeah, it's amazing. I'll buy it. And then my minister starts going, Oh, my God, the house is thinking of all military stuff on our mind. And, you know, we'll you know, appreciate it when it's done. And now I've got a storage facility full of archive stuff from the military. So Chris has just been here for last two days, actually. And we've just basically had everything all over the floor. And we just get inspired by different pieces. You know, because in the military, they seem to like when you have the button in thermal layers, and now it's about the part about the layer and system, which much is what would give in today's You know, there's the modern s consumer, we're all looking at layer and layer and down keeping things you know, like to put in our books acts, if it starts raining, the stuff that we're wearing sort of water repellent, it's all to do with like the urban environment as well. So yeah, we got a lot of inspiration from that. In the three years. Prior to launching the brand properly, I travelled the world. I talked to glaciologists about what they needed out, you know, in the Arctic, so we actually ended up sending glaciologist scientists to test our jackets, and see whether the down was, you know, in the jackets were good enough. Actually, in the Emotiv, we were saying that the Arctic jackets should be tight. And they came back saying they were amazing, and stuff like that. So there's, you know, a lot of research from that point. Yeah, well, and I do a lot of reading, I'm always on. I'm always on Instagram, I'm always reading what other brands are doing. You've got to continuously keep your finger on the pulse, but also not be afraid to try new things. Just because, you know, somebody else isn't doing it doesn't make it wrong. So I'm okay with whether we can you know, what's the next stage? What's the next step? What's the new innovation where we're looking next? You know, who else can we talk to that, you know, brings a new fabric to the table that nobody's ever used before or seen before. because it keeps it exciting for the consumer. And it's also for us so that we inspire each other, we can spend two days with each other and come up with a brand new collection, you know, and then and then run with it and then sometimes when you You're making things or your sample things that don't quite work or the, you know, in that colour, it's not right or that fabric. So there's a lot of development work goes into it, but I think the hardest thing we've developed is the T shirt. Natural to come home. Well, it just sits on the body. You know. So a jacket is you can have it oversized, and it's sort of fitted people and got the T shirt actually fits and has no getting away of getting away with it's got to fit now it's got to fit right. And it just looks crap, right? I mean, it's just boxy and shapeless. Yeah, exactly. And I quite like a bit of an oversized T. It's just who I am. But then obviously as we've gone along, you can shoot you know, the customers like to do more fitted tees. And so we started suar t shirts made English fine Cotton's and docking field, which is in Manchester, it's an old cotton mill. So it's the first time we've started spinning cotton again in over 70 years. They're making our T shirts like the old cotton mill, which has been incredible story for us to make our sweaters and our hoodies as well. So it's local in the area, it's about eight miles away from where I'm sitting now, which is great for the story. And then we started doing some more fitted activities with supima cotton over in California. So that's quite an amazing little collaboration at the moment subpoenas, the best cotton, you can get one of the best cotton you can get in the world. From California, they've done a bit of a collaboration with at the moment creating a baselayer sort of T shirts are a bit more stretchy, a bit more athletic, as well. So you have a constantly developing and we're constantly making and you know, looking for inspiration anyway. That sounds like to me, that's probably the most one of the most rewarding parts for you. And the most enjoyable part is doing all the creating. Yeah, there's like sourcing and doing the researching and kind of doing those collaborations. One step beyond that what is like the most enjoyable part for you, I guess, seeing the finished product or seeing people where it is also going to be a good bonus I imagine, right? Yeah, I think the most enjoyable part for me is people enjoying what we're doing, you know, the feedback that we get from the funds and followers that are buying the stuff, you know, we're selling four or five jackets to the same customers, they keep coming back and the repeat business is great. That's for me, you know, we put all the hard work in, put the design in, you know, all the the bits and bobs to make it all happen. All the headaches. And then at the end when people are really liking what we're doing, that's the most rewarding thing for me. people wearing the jackets with pride or you know, the text has lots of photographs, saying this is the best thing I've ever worn. You know, we've got hardcore funds out there the sort of with you know, CPX company funds that still know them funds, you got 10 see that there's so many great brands out there. And then these guys are not just buying their products but blind seven other as well. And coming back and saying this is just amazing. You know, it's amazing product is dusting of worn is this really rewarding. Jamie, it sounds like it's got a brand that's got a massive broad appeal. Because like if you look at the products and knew the history and where it's coming from, you've got kind of Manchester element, the mod element, like you say, I'm a 90s boy as well, huge races fan, and you always have those kind of influences in the fashion element. But you've got that military background to it as well. So imagine there's a big appeal with people's like servicemen and people that really appreciate the utility of something like this as well. Yeah. Yeah, I mean, we've got a lot of servicemen that buy the stuff as well, we have a captain in the British forces that actually loves the gear, and we send it over to him. So you know, that's, that's great, because he's, you know, using it as a, obviously a fashionable item, but you can appreciate the quality of, you know, if the military spec, especially I feel is that we did a collaboration with our care. I wanted to do that club. So we we did bring that military aspect to the brand. But again, make it authentic, so that it is military because they make for the military. So they all kind of jackets in the field jackets and pockets and we've got a military specification. Then, you know, we've got this amazing camo that we did that was developed by ARCA with dins more milk in Ireland. And it's an organic cotton has a DWI finish, which is the water repellent, drop lined the whole jackets fully seam tape. So it's fully waterproof. You know, it's for me a piece of artwork on where and the actual one of the spec as well. One of the criterias let's say that I gave to Chris, when we're designing things is everybody has to say, Oh, that's good. When they put the jacket on. Everybody has to feel that it feels good. And then if it doesn't, then it's not good. But yeah, you know, so that's one of the Great theories, you know, do you get that all fooling when you put stuff on? Yeah, because you need to feel special in these clothes, right as well. I mean, that's the whole point for you, you want people to actually, you know, feel like there, there's a bit of X Factor going on with these clothes, but it's a bit of an experience. Yeah, I think that if you're going to invest in a brand and invest in something instead of, you know, being disappointed when you buy an 80 pound t shirt, and you open it, and you think, Oh, my God, why have I just paid 80 quid for that? It doesn't fit, right. It doesn't sit on me, right? It's twisted, it shrinks in the wash when you wash it. You know, I mean, what we're trying to do at seven hours is you know, and there is the word sustainability going about, but it is about making clothes that lasts longer. You know, making clothes that are not going to go into landfill the first and second time you wear them because they're Miss shaped and things like that are made locally as well. So lovin zero, buying sensibly, you know, you're buying from buying quality all the time. And that's, you know, having the seven layer system as the seven layers in the brand has allowed us to be very diverse. So we don't directly really compete with anybody but our own our own entity, because we can do down jackets to three layer outerwear jackets, to cotton jackets, to bento jackets, we can have systems where we could do a space system. So next Christmas rate of view 22 we're looking at, you know, the miles and the space type of systems where we could make reflective outerwear and go really loud with it and be very fashionable with it. But then we could create another system like the MTP system that's very sort of outdoors, down to earth, you know. And the way we've developed the brand allows us to do that. So it keeps it very exciting. We're not just sort of niched into one area where we just have to do down codes. We've got some great mid layers, shirts that have got coolmax technology. So when they you know when it's sunny, basically, the coolmax helps call you inside. So you know we've got cobalt technology from Shahla, that's UV protected, you know, so you when you're when you're wearing stuff, you actually UV protected from the sun. And it also stops the heat from going through the garments and stuff. So, so there's plenty of technology within what we do. But we also make it look pretty cool to wear as well. Interesting. Gave me I felt like I could talk to you for hours on this subject. It's a really, really interesting, many layers to the story. If you don't mind me and the pan. It's It's curious that you're saying that I'm talking to you about this, because I'm actually in the middle of a. An idea. It's a it's an idea that I've been pitching around some publishers for a while. Yeah, of the most famous movie jackets on screen that people have seen over the years. So I'm just in the mode of putting that presentation together. And you obviously have like, I don't know that. The military Parker from taxi driver? Oh, yeah. Yeah. Top Gun aviator jackets. Do you have any? When when you look at films, do you? Do you kind of take inspiration from that? Or do you kind of pick one out? Go? That's a nice jacket. Sir. Let's have a look at something like that. Yeah. Well, we're doing a collaboration at the moment with a big Swiss company watchmaker. They, they create watches the 30,000 pounds of watch, you know, beautiful watches. They really wanted to do something with us. So at the moment where our mood board looks back to the 1979 film alien. Oh, wow. Okay, great. Yeah, so we've taken you know, a lot of it a lot of inspiration from because of, you know, films of old way ahead of the Star Wars. Let's say we look at the palette, colour palettes of Star Wars George Lucas used to do and, you know, there's a lot of inspiration from the old sort of films that we use as well. So like alien, the colours that we're using at the moment, he wears a great midlayer shirt, a bit like this blue that I've got on now. So yeah, but we're always looking at any sort of inspo from different films. Yeah, to bring, you know, our collections together. So but it will always throw that tech element at it. So it won't just be a cotton t shirt or a cotton midlayer shirt, it will be a cotton stretch with the D WR on it or some sort of wicking technology insider or something that just makes it a little bit more exciting for us to show you mate in the pub. Yeah, yeah. And that's what I've always had. Since I've been buying clothes is always to have a story behind whatever it is I'm wearing. Yeah, and it's a it's a it's a nice little icebreaker that you might you might need Yeah, I'm certainly occasion will be at heart. You know, we all like yeah, collect about jaw you know, so we've got the seven l budges. Now that become a bit of a collect Designed to, people are starting to it's I think we've got four out at the moment. So we've got the two, oh geez, the originals which a lot the black and white and then the just the black one. And then we've got green ones coming out blue ones coming out got a red one coming out. And we've got a lot of people asking, you know, can we buy them separately and a lot of collectors now. So, you know, it's like I say someone else doing its own thing, we're enjoying it because people are enjoying it. You know, if we if we were doing it, and nobody was buying it or thought it was rubbish, you'll be very disheartened. But we, again, me and Chris, get a lot of inspiration from people loving what we're doing. So just continue to keep doing what we're doing. And we'll use inspiration from all around the world, it's been difficult because we're not been able to travel. So you know, we've had to take a lot of inspo from the internet and what other brands are doing as well. And then hopefully, we'll be able to go and see our ambassadors as well, because in a lot of work with people around the world as well. So I've been asked to go and see the monitor photographer called Jimmy Jimmy Nelson, we're doing a bit of work with him. He's a great photographer that does not work with sort of African tribes and, you know, going into Africa in taking photographs of just like amazing natural places and stuff like that. So we're doing a bit of work with him where we've made a portable camera with gibellini cameras in Italy. So they basically they're like the old full frame cameras with the bellows in the middle. Yeah, so Alessandra, accordions, oh, yeah. Yeah, he managed to 3d print one, while they 3d print their cameras. So he did a 3d print for us is put, you know, seven l on it, we've now got the camera, we're going to be given that to a couple of ambassadors that going over to Iceland in a couple of weeks time, they're going to use the camera to take some photographs, while they're over there with our gear on and enjoy all that story. Going over to Jimmy Nelson, who's then going to take it to one of these photo shoots in maybe Africa or wherever, wherever we go in and take the camera to do that. And so we've got some exciting little projects coming up. Sounds good. How's your photography these days? You still taking photos of the products? Yeah, I do. I mean, everything on the website, while on the Instagram at the moment is mine. I have brought in now another company called wave studio, a shout out to those guys who are amazing. Normally, waste has now taken on that responsibility for helping me do because the busier we get in, obviously, I've got to run the business as well and the brand. Always be taking photographs. So those guys are now gonna start taking off from shops. And helping us do with the campaigns. We're also having a brand new website built at the moment. That's a very tech website. At the minute, the website that we've got, again, was sort of developed by me, which you start off with a brand new, you don't know whether people are gonna like it or not. So, you know, the more we've gone along over the last 12 months, we've seen that people are really into it, and it's building quite nicely. So we're doing a brand new website now. It's very, very sort of graphically driven, you know, high tech, it's gonna look amazing, she'll be ready in about a week's time for the loan, new collection for Christmas. So that's all going to coincide. And then hopefully, you know, we studio and the guys will take on the, the campaigns and the editorials that we need as well. Which then frees me up a bit more to do what I'm best at doing photographs everywhere. Yeah, you're just evolved. We've evolved as a business and evolved as a brand. And it's been exciting up to now and it's it's becoming more and more exciting because we love to be creative. We love to meet great professionals around the world and slightly say we get inspired by different things all the time. So awesome on them followers. And now you got a new website coming but in the meantime, people can still visit seven layer.com and have a look through some of the not just some of the products but also some of the great articles on the site and some of the history on the military layering etc. As it's all up there. It's a great place to forage around. You're gonna have you done any videos on the archives that you got like the 500 odd uniforms in warehouses? Not Not yet. But we will be doing a lot of requests from people. We started up like a little seven l underscore vintage Instagram page. Everything on there is everything we've used so far. But I've got tonnes to put on there. It's just finding time to photograph them and get them on. I'm going to look for that now seven out underscore vintage. Yeah. But yeah, we will we will be doing and we'll be inviting. We'll be doing a few store days where we'll just put out the vintage stuff. And we'll be putting stories or put where the vintage you know, Parker's came from. So, for instance, we have quite a few Parker's that are made from Then title and bento was actually developed by or created by Winston Churchill to protect the pilots that ended up in the sea. So it gave them about 20 minutes before the perished and 30 minutes for for us to be able to go and get them back out the sea and then put them back in an aeroplane. So the ventile story came from Manchester was started by Winston Churchill because he needed a fabric that was waterproof. So, you know, we've got a few RF Parkers that are made from bento, and then we'll be using bento very shortly for a W 22 collection. So bento is now owned by well it's a Swiss Swiss now the Brits sold it to the Swiss right and we bring in a bit of that back home and doing some pentile jackets and with a bit of a knock you know the all the RF Parker's as well these are things of beauty I'm on the I'm on the Instagram now seven our underscore vintage people gonna have a look at these Parker's just the old like a floral leaf pattern, or is it a moss, moss green one there, the Jeremy army reversible snow camera. So well. Yeah, we'll get jackets. And then we've got like a bomber coming out. This winter will automatically so it's a it's a bomb, attack bomber. So it's all made from pretty much off down as very tacky fabrics. And we're just stuck it all up. So it's not like the old vintage stuff. It's just based off that aesthetically, but it's very quick. But lots of bits and bobs may? Well it's been a, it's been a real pleasure to get to know your brand a bit better and to get to know you, Jamie. So thanks so much for your time in between all these projects you've got on the go. Very interested in the the alien watch, I don't know what that's going to be called, or the product that's going to come out of the collaboration with the company, but they're developing it already. I mean, the watch is amazing. It's very high tech, is it the company which I won't say the name yet because we've finalised the agreement, but you know, supply dime, the movie with his watch and stuff like that. So it's very, very high tech, very beautiful things. But the very only make a limited edition of say 12 watches for the in the world. So you know, we'll have a seven out logo on their on their watch. And they'll have their brand on our stuff as well as a club. And it's going to be fun. It's going to be really good. I'm really looking really looking forward to that. So well. I'll be keeping an eye on what's going what's going on in the website and everyone else should be as well. Gary, thanks so much for your time and best of luck with getting that broadband sorted but insulation, you you can still go to the end of the garden and get some good connection. It's his work so far. What is not always like this. It's normally Manchester. That's why. Yeah, listen, I let you go and crack on with your day. But thanks again for taking time out. Thank you very much. Appreciate it. How about that? Thank you, Jamie, and website once again seven layer.com. That's a place to go to have a look at all the garments. And we'll put all the show notes over at menswear startup co.uk make sure you're following us on the social so you can get updated when we do new posts, podcasts, etc. And if you want to come on the show, maybe tell us about your brand and your journey then email us here at info at men's West out at codit. uk. Okay, thanks a lot. Until next time