Menswear Style Podcast

Tarlach de Blácam, Founder of Inis Meáin

September 07, 2020 Menswear Style Episode 82
Menswear Style Podcast
Tarlach de Blácam, Founder of Inis Meáin
Chapters
Menswear Style Podcast
Tarlach de Blácam, Founder of Inis Meáin
Sep 07, 2020 Episode 82
Menswear Style

Inis Meáin, established in 1976, is a luxury design and manufacturing company. Inis Meáin is one of the Aran Islands situated off the west coast of Ireland. Renowned for its unique history of knitting, it is a tradition that has been refined by the advance of time and technology and then reinterpreted for each collection in the finest of yarns. Bright and subtle colours, inspired by land, rock and sea, reflect the seasons. This is the island where all the clothes that bear the Inis Meáin name and symbol of the upturned currach boat are made and exported all over the world.

In this episode of the MenswearStyle Podcast we interview Inis Meáin Founder Tarlach de Blácam about how the business was first set up with the aim to provide jobs for the younger residents so they wouldn't need to leave the island for work. Today they have 50 different knitwear styles that are sold globally within stores such as Todd Snyder, Bergdorf Goodman, Beams and Anderson & Sheppard. Our host Peter Brooker and Tarlach also discuss the heritage and how Aran sweaters are world renowned, hand knitting, life on the wild Atlantic island, and growing an online business. 

Whilst we have your attention, be sure to sign up to our daily MenswearStyle newsletter here. We promise to only send you the good stuff.

Show Notes Transcript

Inis Meáin, established in 1976, is a luxury design and manufacturing company. Inis Meáin is one of the Aran Islands situated off the west coast of Ireland. Renowned for its unique history of knitting, it is a tradition that has been refined by the advance of time and technology and then reinterpreted for each collection in the finest of yarns. Bright and subtle colours, inspired by land, rock and sea, reflect the seasons. This is the island where all the clothes that bear the Inis Meáin name and symbol of the upturned currach boat are made and exported all over the world.

In this episode of the MenswearStyle Podcast we interview Inis Meáin Founder Tarlach de Blácam about how the business was first set up with the aim to provide jobs for the younger residents so they wouldn't need to leave the island for work. Today they have 50 different knitwear styles that are sold globally within stores such as Todd Snyder, Bergdorf Goodman, Beams and Anderson & Sheppard. Our host Peter Brooker and Tarlach also discuss the heritage and how Aran sweaters are world renowned, hand knitting, life on the wild Atlantic island, and growing an online business. 

Whilst we have your attention, be sure to sign up to our daily MenswearStyle newsletter here. We promise to only send you the good stuff.

Unknown:

Hello, and welcome to another episode of The menswear style podcast. I'm your host Pete Booker. And on this episode, I'm going to talk to tarlac, the blacker co founder of inishmaan. And I'm going to peel off Actually, let me just spell inishmaan first because there's a good chance I'm not pronouncing it right, it's AI n ISMEAIN. I'm going to peel off a little info from their website, which you can find by the way inishmaan dot I II, drawing on the island tradition tarlac and I and I hope I'm saying that right, it's probably an is the wife of tarlac by the way, and the co founder of the company equipped a small factory inish man with six knitting machines and set about working with young islanders whose mothers knitted at home for the tourist industry, the younger generation were more inclined to emigrate in search of work on the mainland or overseas. In a man knitting company offered regular work in a factory setting, attracting young people who would otherwise have left the island forever. Today inishmaan knitting company continues to delve into the rich knitting heritage of the island for inspiration, reinterpreting traditional stitches and styles in the finest yarns to create beautiful and sophisticated garments for contemporary living. So that interview of tarlac COMM And I really enjoyed it Tyler talks about life on the island the history of the Aran sweater and swimming in the sea with the imminent threat of blue and basking sharks nipping at his heels. It's a it's a meaty episode. I think you'll enjoy it. But before we get to tarlac Don't forget to check out the show notes at menswear. style.co uk and on the social app menswear style. All the latest fashion news will go up there. Craig aerotow has just published an article on the seven most stylish accessories every gentleman must have. And and there's Wow, that's great. So he just clicked on it. There is a wallet that's got scarah manga written on it. What is all that about bond fans, you need to get on the back of this. Let me book that. bookmark that for later. So that article, sorry, distracted, reading our own articles, and much more on the website. And if you want to tell us about your brand and your journey, you can email the show at info at menswear. style.co.uk Okay. Let's get into this. This is a good one. And I hope you enjoy it. Here is that interview of tarlac, co founder of inishmaan. So it's my great pleasure to introduce tarlac to Blackcomb who is the co founder of inishmaan how are you doing today Tyler? Very good. Thanks, Peter. It's a It's a real pleasure to talk to you. Perhaps you can just introduce yourself to who you are and a little bit about the brand, please. Yeah, well. My wife and I moved back she was a native and I'm originally a Dubliner I used to come to this island. It's the we operate from a tiny little island off the west coast of Ireland. inishmaan is the middle island of the Aran Islands, which straddle Galway Bay on the west coast. And, and specifically, Irish speaking or Gaelic speaking for techni draw strong here I used to come years ago as a student I was doing Celtic languages, which was a it's a fabulous degree, it was only about three or four of us in with the professors and and we had a wonderful time and he was Professor used to send me down here samples down here to to learn eyes, and I just love the place, fell in love with it. And I always never wanted to live in a city and I always loved where my mother was from another part of the west of Ireland. I used to be down with my uncle's farming there and I always thought I was going to end up in the, in the west of Ireland. So I met this young lady who was teaching in Dublin, who was from the island after having been down here several times myself. And we got married and we decided to move here. It was crazy when you think of it, we didn't have electricity, we didn't have running water. Wow, everything was rolled ashore from from cargo and passenger ferry. anchored offshore and that's how we operation for the best of 20 years. And yeah, I got involved in all sorts of community development in the early days to help try and get get things moving in terms of electricity and running water and so on. And we set up this little industry. I recently came here you know, when you do a degree like I did, you become shorter you're groomed to become a another academic to continue the whole, the whole cycle going. That wasn't for me, I just didn't, you know, it was it was a great, great thing to do. And I really enjoyed, like, you know, a fabulous degree in literature, but I didn't want to be a researcher for the rest of my life for an academic either. So we had plans to write and do all sorts of things and but got, as soon as we got here, I got involved in all sorts, as I said, all sorts of things like and providing electricity and running water for the island and there was a little air service trying to get the runway done for that and getting a harbour where the ferry could come in, so on so forth, and one of the things we did was we, we were, you know, we want to do a little bit of industry for a lot of the youngsters. In fact, all the youngsters here at that time, and used to be involved with their young, really young women with their mothers in a small craft industry. yarns are famous for for knitwear. And, and down through the years you've probably heard of the the Aran sweater, right vertical colas. Well, the classic Aaron's sweater was a highly directly decorated sweater, which was originally you know, and knitted by the locals in angelic wait for little boys and girls for their first communion or confirmation, which was a rite of passage for young Catholics in the west of Ireland and all over. And in fact, they used to get these other great photographs of them. And there was a there was a small cottage industry built on that people looking for these highly decorated Aran sweaters in all sorts of fancy, the tourist industry, the west coast of Ireland, Irish American shops, you had agents, you know, getting having people knit these in, in what I thought were scratchy or yarns that were weren't good, there was one or two guys doing them in really good quality yarn. But it was very basic bog standard and patterns, whatever the women had in their repertoire, decorated in an angelic, quite right. And then in the 60s and 70s. I mean, people like Steve McQueen, Marilyn Monroe were shot were these things on these garments. And of course, they, they, they were his Aran sweater became very, very famous, but there was an awful lot more than a repertoire of local knitters than that, and that's what fascinated me. And when we started doing this, you know, we we found that, to provide employment and to build a little business here for young people. We needed to export it, we needed to do something new and different. Because I thought, you know, he couldn't get boards different than the same old iron sweater Forever, forever and ever. It wasn't something I was particularly interested in anyway. Right. So we we got involved in really put a lot of work and effort into developing our own labour we thought Aaron's were that should be branded. But of course, if we were in France, of course, it'd be protected. But in Ireland or in the probably the UK is not protected. Like for example, Harris tweed is protected politically, the British government or Scottish tweets, but Aaron's wherever. So we developed our own brand and our own logo, which we've registered around the world, which is inishmaan. And we started designing, you know, quality based on the tradition and taking from the archives and what the knitters used to knit here over the years. And, you know, I mean, you take some photographs, and then it talks to the women here, the great hand knitters here and found that they had an awful lot more to their repertoire. There were knitting, you know, quite restrained stuff, but really nice for, you know, quite elegant and restrained. What the fishermen were workwear. Yeah. Just to check in for a little bit of mustard, a little bit of some particular diamond or something. And just working on that and doing it as a new a different way. And digging into the archives, we found lots of these patterns. And we started developing what we call workwear from the Iron Islands, and widening out the possibilities, but still, you know, coming from the tradition and the history and the heritage and, and playing on that and using that, and then introducing new stitches, new ways of doing things, colour, softer qualities, because they, you know, the scratchy old era was very good maybe for carpets wasn't suited, but, you know, the wall that was being used wasn't really soft. We've forgotten the first things when I brought samples brought with me trying to export the cell, finding new markets, you know, people say, Oh, you know, you've got to soften it up. It's got to be soft. Yeah. Beautiful. And we over the years, we've just grown it year by year, we've built quite a substantial Collection. This year's collection, we have 50, different styles and qualities in the 50 different styles in an in a huge range of colours and quantities as well going into out to the market. And we've just built up a range of clients around the world. And I mean, it sounds simple like this took us 40 years to do it to be over 40 years in business. And we made an awful lot of mistakes along the way, as you can imagine, as you do when you're building a little business. And we gradually decided we have to just it has to be something new and unique every season because we're selling to the top stores and they're looking for something new. They're looking for a new Pandora's box of new ideas and style and quality, quality every time we come to the market. That's every season. And nowadays it's every every half year because we do a Spring Summer Collection and linens and linen silken qualities. And we develop a new new collection for that. Yeah. And gradually we've we eked out a little section for ourselves in the market. And we we just show once per season in it's mainly I have to say, as many men's wear what we do. Yeah, its heritage. But really, I mean, you can't just live by heritage alone. You got to bring bring it forward, like everything, you know, it needs to be updated. And you know, this is what we do. We it. I hate fast fashion. I hate fashion, I hate fast fashion. We just do try to do something that's new and different and stylish, stylish, the word I like to use stylish quality design with everybody what I preach in this in this little building of ours is style quality design. That's what we're selling, you know, and it has to be top quality and it has to be more and more sophisticated. And because the kind of people we're selling to, because when you operate from a tiny little island off the west coast of Ireland, you cannot compete on, you know, on, on volume. It's got to be you've got to have something new, different and unique. And that's what we aim to do. And somehow or another we succeed in doing it every season we've we've as I said, we built up a little coterie of followers in some of the best stores around the world. You know, I mean, Bergdorf Goodman, New York. used to have Bernie's Bernie's gone bust now on the treadmill so less than 12 months ago. But there's a great great new guy called Todd Snyder he's way down in lower Manhattan and we're doing great business with him by burger taking over all the Barney's visit Todd Snyder look him up. Yeah, he's super super guy and just great business we do a lot with him. And then we have a myriad of specialty stores right across the United States. We'd have Isa town in Tokyo wacko united arrows and beams and ships in in Japan and and then a myriad of specialty stores throughout Europe and you know in London we have for years and years we worked with grey flannel and children's straight which has just been a Richard who's owned it for ever and ever has handed over the reins as we're talking in the UK has handed over the reins to Tim Evers to his fantastic yeah Taylor Taylor from London and we're excited to be working with and yeah two or three small little specialty stores in London we used it a long time ago work with Liberty foresee that doesn't go anymore. And as the new Shepherd in in Savile Row Of course because we're great. And when we do with the up and down the UK we do a couple of we do work with one or two people in Manchester in Edinburgh and Aberdeen so on. And yeah, that's that's the stores right throughout Europe. I mean, I think what's so I used to run a shop in Cambridge, I used to run my own menswear store. And yeah, I didn't run my own brand. I wasn't a patternmaker designer and think about get other brands in and I'd also look for kind of obscure brands but what I'd really be looking for were brands that had a really good romance to them and a story because when people come into the store I could then kind of Eulogise about this brand and say what was really different about them. I remember in particular one brand that made bags so used to use the same wax that they would use on the boats out on the ship. on the coast of Ireland, and I would say like these bags are actually you know, they're so waterproof. They're designed to, you know, be put over the holes of boats and cover yachts and stuff like that. And that's, that was basically my USP, but I'd love to talk about it. And I think maybe part of part of your romance is that people like to carry that story on for you. Yeah, yeah, I knew we tried to do that at the beginning to make a big story. But yeah, that was fine. But you had to you really have to have a really good product. And that yeah, it's, it's really, it's just it adds to the story, isn't it, the story adds to the product gives it and gives it authenticity, and background. And people nowadays, we've found in the last 10 or 15 years or less, I mean, people are really, really looking to find something that's authentic, they're fed up of fast fashion that, you know, here today, gone tomorrow, or at least you were at a couple of times in a dump it and you go on to the next season, but we make it I mean, you buy sweater finish manners sweater for life, it's something it's an investment, it's something that you're going to wear for, you're going to enjoy wearing and have it forever, because it's a lot of thought and effort gone into it. And an awful lot of handwork going into it as well, because we haven't finished everything. We have some fantastic hand finishers here who can deliver the, you know, turn anything? Yeah, it's half finished. It's got a problem. I mean, I've been painted her hand finisher here she can, she can make it look absolutely spanking new. You get pieces back from customers or something came in this morning, because they wanted a fixed and you want to see the quality went back out again, because somebody had pulled a thread and they cut it with scissors, which is quite difficult to fit to mend knitwear she did she did a super job. We have great hand finishes and great a great team really, really with it a huge heritage of work and very proud of what they do and what they have. They brought with them into the into this industry and they're very happy to be involved. I have some I must say I have about eight or 10 core workers who've been with us for 40 years. It's the background and certain, you know, they're in happy doing it every day. And we're all a team happy to work together. And it's it's great. It's so exciting to get it all together and bring it out there. But unfortunately, I didn't get a chance to show Spring Summer 21 so me so off Mike tarlac and I spoke about whether we should do this visually and show off the showroom. But alas, this is a podcast, so we're not going to get the benefits of that today. Unfortunately, Todd, can you just tell me what it I guess Tell me what life is like on the island now as opposed to say 40 years ago some of the some of the keys for people that haven't heard of the island, for example, I mean, can you just give us maybe a little backdrop to what it what it's like to live there. And well, I'm a huge outdoor person very very fond to the sea and you couldn't be in a better place if you'd like to be in the sea. for many many years I used to a lot of scuba diving and which was very nice. You want to bring up a nice piece of crustacean for dinner and but nowadays I don't I'm not I mean she's to dive Atlantic Atlantic waters you really have to be very fit and I'm getting on and I'm told that I better be taken easy so I'm I do less of that I do more more angling from from a little book we have and I do a lot of swimming, I swim. I love swimming in the ocean. I love swimming in freshwater in the sea water and I swim at the moment I'd be swimming right up to October November and then I'll start again as soon as I can after the new year maybe about I give it a miss around December January when the temperature really starts to sink down. Although I got a super new neoprene suit and I'm going to have a go at this winter as well. There's something very something really really fresh and refreshing about a swim in the sea. I mean swimmers in a swimming pool is nothing I just hate swimming pools But yeah, I do I and then the walks I mean the walk show amazing and there's the lights changing all the time, and winter and summer and it's it can be you know, be a different place in a couple of hours. We walk walk out by the cliffs we have famous local writer called Tim Robinson, an English man who came to live here about the same time as we set up this company is a great friend of ours, unfortunately died this year. He's Deaf to five beautiful books descriptions of landscape and The foreign phone or the islands and anyway his description of the cliffs of the west coast of this island the Southwest tip of this island the biggest storm beach in Europe where where he says rocks as big as cottages and as some as big as cars have been flung up by the sea you can imagine the kind of seas we get out there and watch that sea in an awful lot of the big swells when it's when it's not too dangerous to be out there. It's spectacular. It's wonderful to get out there I mean, when you come back before see we're not doing we're not doing that much travelling now but coming back from some of these trips we do on sales to go out there and clear the head there's nothing better than it and I love it. And is there any sharks out there? I mean, I don't swim in the sea because of sharks but I don't know what it's like your island and not not so many I'm told they're beginning to come move up into the water into the what we get into waters are getting warmer here. Right. And a friend of a friend of mine who does scuba diving has sent me a couple of shots of blue shark he's seen I have but I tell you what we have and there are a lot of them coming back as very peaceful. One of the biggest animals in the sea. The the the basking shark. Oh yeah, like basking shark. The basking shark is complete the shark right? on plankton. It feeds on plankton. Yeah, big, massive big males about almost two foot wide soaks in all the plankton and just peacefully. sails through the sea. Yeah, beautiful. Yes. We have some great shots of him. We've got underwater shots of him. Yeah, there's a there's a film that features an otter. I'm trying to think of where they have ring on brightwater that's it ring on bright war. Have you ever seen that? tarlac sorry, you haven't seen it? No. Okay. I employee to watch. There's about a writer that goes. I think he goes to Ireland. And there's, he has to, he's taken with him this otter that he's adopted along the way. An offer Yes, and otter and he has to he has to feel that he can't figure out what to feed this otter and the locals are telling him like he needs to meet. He needs some, you know, some fresh meat. So there's this basking shark that's running up and down the coast of this island so he goes out and goes through these great lengths to fish where the shark catches the shark brings it back cuts it up cooks it gives it to the otter the otter turns its nose up at it and just walks away. Not interested. But that's how I know about Chuck I bet you there's far too oily for him. Ah man No. Do you know that they used to hunt them in the in the 18th century the SIR the 19th century. Wow here and what for for the oil because that was the only source of oil. They had the lamps. That's what kept the lamps going in the wintertime. The oil from the basking shark poor basking shark had to give up his oil. The liver was like, you know, you squeeze the oil out of you get gallons of oil out of it. Wow. And so maybe that's what your other friend didn't like about basking sharp, too oily I would think too early and you must feel if you're a basking shark, you feel like you've been given like the nuts from God's casino. You're huge. You're 25 feet long and you're a shark. But then you don't have any teeth and all you're eating is plankton. You got done on the way it really is really misnamed. You shouldn't be called a shark at all. It's such a peaceful, peaceful, poor devil. Yeah, well, you take care out there if you're swimming and then blue sharks are on the on the rise. Will do. And so I hear also, again, this is just a modicum of research I did about the island before speaking to you, Tara like that. There's a sport called kiat. sired dad. Thank you. And this is a big traditional sport that goes on in the island. That's right. That's right. That's right. Yeah, it's played on St. Patrick's Day 17th of March. Right. I think we we suspect it I don't know why a lot of things lasted here for it, you know, folk folk Ways and Means as well as folktales. Things got carried on and kept going. in areas like this the word you know, that were quite cut off from other parts of the country. We feel and we're pretty sure it's an early fall I use many wood hurling, which is huge in our island and a lot of the east coast of Ireland, right through the country. You know, it's played with what's called fish litter which the leather ball bit like not too Different from a cricket ball but not as hard as a cricket ball with with Hurley sticks and a great game, but we think this was a primitive an early, early version of it. It's called cat and it's, well, the only place left in our in the world still played. And the boys all get together and they put teams together on St. Patrick's Day and they put money on it. And they they have this long shot with a little crop piece of us of wood instead of a bowl where they put it up against the stone, flip it in the air and hit it and you have to say you have to send it about 30 yards of 40 yards. And then that's a shot. And so on UK it's anyway that's that's the game and they all end up of course, dividing the money with the winners spoils at the end and goes to the pub and everybody has a great evening. That's the cat's cat. That's that's the game. Yeah, it's great game. Just once a year, though. Once once a year. Yeah. Whether it be practising all the way up to from from early March or late February right up to St. Patrick's Day, and then the big game on St. Patrick's Day. Yeah, it's a great game. And we designed a sweater just for the game. We call the hurdler. Yeah, we're launching By the way, we're launching autumn winter. 20. Right. As we talk going out tomorrow, more tomorrow. We're launching the whole collection on our online. Over the last four or five years, we've been growing steadily our online business city trying to get directly to our end users or our end buyers. And it's growing nicely. So we're launching all of that. And we have a couple of colours and hurler going out this coming week. Oh, that's fantastic. I can't wait to see that. Is that on? So that'll be on the website, I guess. But on the web, on the website, we'd be on Instagram, and we'd be doing mailing to all our customers. Yeah, I'd be on Instagram to inishmaan. That's terrific. And you guys are also and we'll put all the links up on on the website. But yeah, you're on Twitter and Facebook and not know just Instagram. It's a bit old fashioned. I don't know you can. You could spend your whole life doing that stuff. You know, oh, tell me about it. We got we got to design a new collection every season twice a year. Come on, we got to spend all these you got the beauties of the world to look out your window? I mean, yeah, basically, I've got a construction site one and peer of mine. Oh, so, so sorry for you theatre. So the talk about the website? If you can please tell like I mean, when did that start? And when did you really figure I need to get online? Was it straight? Like at the birth of e commerce? Or did it come later? I suppose over over a period of time. And yeah, I mean, we said the websites been there for 10 or 15 years. I think she's I can't remember exactly. But it's been there. for quite a long time. selling online has only started about five or six years ago. I think we did we take we sold about a couple hundred sweaters the first year? Well, we're well into the thousands now. Thanks be to God. And it's moving along nicely. And we I just think that because of our location, because I'm getting known in the years, I don't want to be dragging suitcases and bring collections around the world. I think it's you know, we get people who fly in here and now to buy a sweater or to buy to buy the buy a half a dozen sweaters. Yeah. I mean, somebody came into the shop the other day, they hired a boat. They arrived, the girl Come down just to pick up see this guy, he's buying half the shop. So he come in to buy just specifically to buy for his family. And I think we spent he was spending a fortune. So I obviously made some. And yeah, when you see that, things like that, and you know, well, I'm just saying, why don't we just try and get more people to come to us rather than us have to go out there and I mind you. I'm very loyal to some great great customers. We have some great little specialty stores, particularly our friend grey flannel in children's street in London and Anderson Shepherd in London. Yeah, and and all the others Dixon, Edinburgh and so on. So Watson in Andrew Watson in Belfast, believe it or not, yeah, we're very, very, very tied to these people. But I still think we could, we can grow we grow an online business ourselves and maybe do more more. Do you know what we did this Spring Summer Collection 21. I bought I bought six mannequins. And I got a little stabilised for the latest iPhone 11. And I was told that's the way to do it. And I put everything up there in our beautiful showroom in sharp overlooking Galway Bay, and overlooking the whole island and I got everybody to come in on on video link and we showed them the collection the spring summer 21 collection days night and then walked outside and give them a look at look at the island as well as anyone to come and stay Of course. Yeah, but yeah, that's that's the way things are going. I'm hoping that we can continue to do more and more that way and less and less air miles or whatever you call it carbon footprint, which would be great. How often do you get to London? I'd be in London about three or four times a year? A couple of times and yeah, yeah. Well, I just round the corner from shortland Street. My girlfriend Oh relays around there. So we're on marleybone Well, Montague square which is kind of that's where I stay. Sorry. Yeah, that's so Ian Fleming used to live down there. You got the john Lennon and Yoko plaque. I just grabbed that. Yeah, this and that. Is that the house where bingo star used to own Jimi Hendrix for a while until he he didn't do any cleaning so they had to check him out. But it's quite it's quite a famous square but next time you're in town we'll go for see if you're around and we can go down to Chilton firehouse. I'll get your drink. Oh, that's really real decor. The hotel I stay? Well, same count. You know, the hotel. It's on George Street. Because said hotels down there. Yeah, it's great little old dog to old fashioned hotel there. Your age is fantastic, by the way. Thank you very much. Sure. Really cool. I'm gonna give that a follow now and I recommend everyone else does as well. inish underscore mean. That's it. Yep. And I love the white Aran sweater. So I've just watched that film. I've just watched a film called knives out where Chris Evans wore a white sweater very similar and it kind of took over the internet for about three months of everyone trying to get this white sweater. Have Have you seen knives out at all? Do you know what I'm? I don't. I'm sorry. I'm really I do a lot of reading Pete. I don't watch. I don't watch TV. I am big into sport knives. They're good decent game of hurling, football, rugby, whatever it is. I'm into it. But I don't watch too many movies. I'm sorry. I read a lot. That's the best way. But to indulge me, I'm going to send you this link anyway to please do it. It was a it was a film perhaps the most notable actor is Daniel Craig. And he's Oh, yeah. But it was the wardrobe for the film was made famous because of this one sweater that Chris Evans wore in it. And people just went absolutely nuts. And then all of a sudden that white Aran sweater trend exploded. So I'll just, I'll send you that link. Please do. Yeah, I'd love to see it. Just Yeah. Listen time. I want to be respectful of your time. Thanks so much for jumping on and and walk. You're very welcome. Not just the brand, but educating me about the island and everything else in between. Well, I enjoyed it too. Lovely talking to you, Peter. Take care. You too. Take care yourself. See you. Bye. Bye. Well, how about that? I could have spoken to tarlac for hours, especially about the sharks and that ring of brightwater film. You have to watch that film. I won't. And I won't spoil it for you. But the main moral of the film is never leave your woman in charge of your pet or doesn't mean well, right away. So let's, you know, make sure you're supporting the good guys and head over to inishmaan.ie. That's website. Treat yourself or your loved one to a government that will last a lifetime. And in the meantime, thanks for tuning in. If you like what you're hearing, leave a review. Perhaps maybe there's a brand or a person you think would make a great guest for the show. Put your suggestions in a comment on iTunes or wherever you shop for your podcasts and until next time.