Menswear Style Podcast

Tonya Kidd-Beggs, Founder of STORIES Parfums

August 13, 2020 Menswear Style Episode 77
Menswear Style Podcast
Tonya Kidd-Beggs, Founder of STORIES Parfums
Chapters
Menswear Style Podcast
Tonya Kidd-Beggs, Founder of STORIES Parfums
Aug 13, 2020 Episode 77
Menswear Style

A fragrance range that weaves a narrative from mislaid memories, childhood dreams and long-forgotten hope; STORIES Parfums is a pilgrimage for the senses. Creative Director & Founder of the perfume house, Tonya Kidd-Beggs, curated each blend personally as a testament to the power of fragrance in her own life. Grasse, on the French Riviera, has a long-established fragrance history dating back to the 17th century. It was here that Tonya developed her first two perfumes, STORIES Nº. 01 and STORIES Nº. 02, using only the finest raw materials sourced from all over the world. Tonya employed time-honoured, traditional methods to formulate the perfumes while trusting her intuition to bring balance to the collection. STORIES Parfums is a luxury fragrance house showcasing unique ingredients from around the world. Through the art of perfumery, Tonya pays tribute to the stories that have shaped her life, allowing the wearer to connect with their own story, past, present and future. To awaken the senses: The notes and undertones in the fragrances are delicately balanced and complex. Each scent reflects a part of the brand’s story while encouraging the wearer to connect with their own nostalgia. The products are designed to inspire the redolence of memories. To be gender-inclusive and unique, the bespoke blend of aromas in each fragrance defies gender barriers. 

In this episode of the MenswearStyle Podcast we interview Tonya Kidd-Beggs, Founder of STORIES Parfums about how the business developed from a hobby into a brand, and her journey of learning the art of perfumery. Tonya worked with a fragrance house in southern France to get first-hand experience in making fragrances and to try and recreate a smell she once discovered whilst going through counselling for a personal trauma aged 12. Our host Peter Brooker and Tonya also chat about favourite fragrance notes and blending, how scents can help you recall memories, working with intuition rather than following trends, creating fragrances from stories, and the significance of the sense of smell.

Whilst we have your attention, be sure to sign up to our daily MenswearStyle newsletter here. We promise to only send you the good stuff.

Show Notes Transcript

A fragrance range that weaves a narrative from mislaid memories, childhood dreams and long-forgotten hope; STORIES Parfums is a pilgrimage for the senses. Creative Director & Founder of the perfume house, Tonya Kidd-Beggs, curated each blend personally as a testament to the power of fragrance in her own life. Grasse, on the French Riviera, has a long-established fragrance history dating back to the 17th century. It was here that Tonya developed her first two perfumes, STORIES Nº. 01 and STORIES Nº. 02, using only the finest raw materials sourced from all over the world. Tonya employed time-honoured, traditional methods to formulate the perfumes while trusting her intuition to bring balance to the collection. STORIES Parfums is a luxury fragrance house showcasing unique ingredients from around the world. Through the art of perfumery, Tonya pays tribute to the stories that have shaped her life, allowing the wearer to connect with their own story, past, present and future. To awaken the senses: The notes and undertones in the fragrances are delicately balanced and complex. Each scent reflects a part of the brand’s story while encouraging the wearer to connect with their own nostalgia. The products are designed to inspire the redolence of memories. To be gender-inclusive and unique, the bespoke blend of aromas in each fragrance defies gender barriers. 

In this episode of the MenswearStyle Podcast we interview Tonya Kidd-Beggs, Founder of STORIES Parfums about how the business developed from a hobby into a brand, and her journey of learning the art of perfumery. Tonya worked with a fragrance house in southern France to get first-hand experience in making fragrances and to try and recreate a smell she once discovered whilst going through counselling for a personal trauma aged 12. Our host Peter Brooker and Tonya also chat about favourite fragrance notes and blending, how scents can help you recall memories, working with intuition rather than following trends, creating fragrances from stories, and the significance of the sense of smell.

Whilst we have your attention, be sure to sign up to our daily MenswearStyle newsletter here. We promise to only send you the good stuff.

Unknown:

Hello and welcome to another episode of The menswear style podcast. I'm your host Pete Brooker. On this episode I'm going to talk to Tanya Kidd Beggs founder and creative director at stories puff farms. I'm going to peel off a little info here from the stories platforms website. paint the picture of the brand, if you will, and the website you can find by the way at stories part farms.com. A perfume range that weaves a narrative from mislaid memories, childhood dreams and long forgotten hope stories performs is a journey for the senses. Founder of the perfume house, Tanya Kidd bags curated each blend personally as a testament to the power of fragrance in her own life. grass on the French Riviera has a long established fragrance history dating back to the 17th century. It was here that Tonya developed her sense under the guidance of her perfumer using only the finest raw materials sourced from all over the world. So I really enjoyed talking to Tanya, she had a very inspirational story to tell, I think it will resonate certainly with a lot of people, especially like me and Tanya, if you're in your 40s you might all of a sudden find some fire in your belly and you want to even rebrand or start something new. But you don't necessarily want to embark on three or four years of schooling and extra education. There are other ways to make your passion your full time gig. so fascinating chat. think you'll enjoy it. All that to come but first make sure you're checking out the menswear style site www. menswear style.co.uk and on the social app men's wear style, all the latest fashion news and our editor Craig has done an awesome article on predicting the future in the luxury market. You know, is this the right time to invest in a Rolex for example? What's the economic outlook from the International Monetary Fund and what are the smart people telling us to do with our money right now check out that article or many more on the website. Make sure that you're tuning in for that and if you want to tell us about your brand and your journey, you want to be a guest on the show. You can email us at info at menswear. style.co.uk Okay. Alright, let's get to it. This is a good one. Hope you enjoy it. Here is that interview with Tanya Kidd Beggs founder and creative director at stories performs. Great. Well, it's my great pleasure to introduce Tanya Kidd, Beggs founder and creative director at stories. perfoms. How you doing today? Tanya? I'm really well how are you doing? I'm really good. Thanks, Tanya. So Tanya, please tell me what it is that you do and tell me about stories performs please. Yes. So as I as you said, my name is Tanya Kidd bags, and I'm founder and creative director of stories performs. And it's a nice shirt fragrance brand that was birthed in 2018. It's very new, we're only two years old. But it actually began as a hobby of mine. So I have four children. And my youngest two are 13 they're twins. And when they were starting to get a little bit older, I decided that I wanted to do something for myself. And a lot of other women would will understand what that means when when you know your kids start to get a little bit older. And so what took me from a hobby and wanting to learn a perfumery actually then began a brand and so that's really how stories problems was was birthed and it wasn't supposed to be a brand at the beginning. But I had I had had such an amazing experience with fragrance and when I started learning a bite and how to you know blend fragrances and learn about both the the art of perfumery that I actually felt I really need to do something about this. Okay, and have you always had an interest in scent, and perfumes and perfumes especially? Yeah, Chino, actually hindsight is a wonderful thing because Looking back, I can say oh my goodness, there's been a thread throughout my whole life. And I really didn't know what that meant until I started working within and with fragrances like five years ago. And but it did start even way back to my grandmother and sadly I didn't know her because she died before I was born. But my mom used to always tell me about her fragrance and the specific fragrance that she wore. And she was an amazing businesswoman in Northern Ireland and and in her day, women didn't work, let alone be a businesswoman. And she broke a lot of glass ceilings for women in her time. So she was always very specific to me and really meant a lot to me. Even though I had never met her, so when I knew what her fragrance was that she wore, and then I had some of her jewellery and her, she had lovely fur coats and stuff. And then when I was able to really connect with her in a way that I actually felt as if I knew her. Oh, yeah. So it's very bizarre. So it really did. It was something that I can see that there has been a thread right through my life. That's interesting. And so what what perfume is that? So I'm gonna keep it a secret. No, yeah, it's just so special to me. And I just am. Yeah, it's very special. I love this. I love the story of connection. It kind of reminds me of, I've always had this fascination with bark. And I've played the piano as a kid and as a grown up as well. And I loved Jesus as of man desiring by bark. And when I was listening to on the radio One day, my mom and I said, God, I love this song. My mom goes, this was your grandmother's favourite. Wow, that's insane. I say. I mean, again, I've got very scarce memories of my grandmother, but just having that kind of out of body feeling connection through, you know, through something that's not quite there, but it's palpable. It just brings it brings it so much closer. Right you look back on it retrospectively. You think well, this is somehow the universe telling me something, but it's Yeah, it's quite Yeah, absolutely. So then I actually am what happened was I had trauma in my life when I was 12. And even my life actually spiralled out of control in later years right through into my 20s and I and I went through really the hard work of of getting rid of the trauma went through counselling and everything. And it was very successful, you know, the trauma, the root of the trauma had been removed, and I was great, but I had no childhood memories prior to the trauma. And so I remember after that I had gone through the counselling, my sense of smell completely changed. And I remember like, this is like 20 years ago, so I was walking with the dogs and stuff and I used to be stopping to smell every you know, couple of feet because my sense of smell just was completely different than it had was prior to me having the consoling and I remember saying then if I there was this smell you sir. And look me and I used to think oh my goodness, I like didn't know what the smell was I could never put my finger I didn't know what notes I was smelling. I had no idea but I just had this really comforting smell. And I remember saying then if I ever make a fragrance I want to try and bottle that smell Hmm So then go forward 20 odd years and and the kids as I said we're all growing up and I am decided okay, I want to go learn about fragrance I've always had this you know love fragrance and especially niche fragrances when it's not in mass market and you're wearing something just something really different. So it was really interesting to me to find it like that but I didn't want to go back into to school or I didn't want to go to university was for kids and you know being in your 40s it's not something that you want to do. So I just started contacting people in grass in the size of France perfumeries and independent perfumers and I just was explaining to them what I wanted to do. And I said I wanted to learn about the fragrance world I wanted to learn about perfumery but I I don't want to go back and do chemistry and all that is needed in that world and and so it was actually one of the the oldest perfume houses in the world actually hidden don't normally open the doors to let people come in and do this and said yes, we would love you to come over, you know, we've just recently started to think about doing this. So off I went on my own, to the south of France to grass with like the kids and the husband and and spent some time then in grass with a wonderful perfumer and she was able to then talk to me through all the different you know, whole families of the appcenter frequence all the different notes how to blend them but I had went with gone with an idea that I wanted to create my own fragrance and when I was there I ended up creating two fragrances and so the first one was this the you know obviously the story I just said to you a bite and wanting to create that you recreate that smell that I have that's when I had gone through counselling and and so from my just my own intuition and what I felt and thought that I knew I am I created this scent. And but what when you're in grass or when you're when you're in a perfume or you sit in a perfume or is Oregon They have all you buy 200 bottles all set in a rind you. And when you're learning about fragrances and notes, what they do is they turn away the name that's on the bottle, like it does. So you Yeah, you don't know what you're smelling. So what they do is they take you through the process, tell me what you feel, what's your sense, you know, but they don't tell you how you should be smelling. So when somebody removes a name from you, we all have this pre conception of smell, which is really fascinating to me. And I had gone with this and could be misconception really off. I didn't like vanilla. And I had gone in and thought I will put everything in this perfume, but not vanilla. But actually when you smell something in pure form. Yeah. And you don't know the name of it. It's completely different. And I actually loved it. I did love vanilla. And I didn't know I was smelling it. And I think vanilla gets a bad rap because of the name. Yeah. Yeah, it's because people go It's so vanilla. But you think well actually, I love vanilla ice cream. I love the smell of vanilla. And I also like vanilla green whiskey. So I don't know why it's suddenly got so much bad PR needs it needs a new PR agent. I know once you know, I think for me, it was actually when I when I was going through this whole process. I realised I actually thought it was something like he can remember the candles you used to get years ago that were very synthetic. And you go into every store and there was this really overpowering smell. That was really sickening. But then it wasn't it wasn't that it wasn't a pure form of of a note. So I think I had gone in with that idea of you know, okay, that's the most disgusting smell. I don't want, you know, to have it. Yeah. But then I guess it is. Yeah, no, it's these, these synthesise these kind of oversaturated smells, but done wrong. But you're right. once they're done right, then there's really nothing quite like them. Absolutely. That's true. True. So after that you've got Are you making the perfumes there while you're there in France? You're putting these together? Yes, so I do it was important when I started speaking to perfumeries and perfumers that they would allow me to work completely on my own. And it was my own intuition. And I said to you only had for number one I had this sense of what I would like to create but I didn't have the words or the vocabulary to to explain what I wanted. And a lot of perfume houses will give em brief sight to perfumers and to companies and I didn't want to do that I wanted to actually be in the complete process from start to finish. So the perfumer that I work with and is amazing. It's she she's Russian and she doesn't speak much English she lives in France and I don't speak French. But we have this fantastic connection with just through fragrances. And we were able to communicate fantastically and she just like me to sit at the perfumers Oregon after she told me a little bite the difference sense and blending and all the ins and outs of perfumery. And she just let me sit there and choose what I wanted and put together and what she does is at the very end, she just brings it together and it's it's what I would say it balance it brings the chemistry to it brings her her gifting to it, she doesn't take anything out of it, she doesn't put anything in and she never put something in front of me and says oh, this goes with this, you should try that. So that was really important to me on my journey when I was doing it I didn't want to be guided I was really sure in my way that I wanted to do this myself. And so when I was creating number two fragrance and I did that at the same time when I was in grass, and this is what was the restoration of my recent after the trauma. So even though I'd gone through all the hard work and the trauma had been removed and I did still didn't have my memories prior to the trauma and and I went and was working with the fragrances and even when I was working with each note, it didn't remind me anything specifically about my childhood. It was actually when we put everything together and the in the test tube type thing that we literally had everything just put I had picked all everything I wanted. There's 20 different notes in there. And I just sat back and I was just so gobsmacked because it just took me right back to my grandfather's garden. And what was very significant to me about that was it was actually prior to the trauma. So it was a memory that I had lost because I couldn't remember if I'd had a good childhood I couldn't really remember everything had been overshadowed by this this trauma. So when I had that doubt just like it was like a vision was just like a picture dropping into my mind. And and then when I dissected the fragrances and what I actually had put into it was nearly everything exactly what was in my grandfather's garden. So I didn't know that, that that's what I was putting in. Right? It was really significant to me. And yeah, so I, she allows me to work completely. on my own I cheese based in grass and Paris we meet, we've already created more fragrances, which I'll tell you about later. But and, you know, we just meet wherever we meet. So the last time we met, it was in Paris. And again, it was a straight from my own intuition. I was getting advice from people in the industry and saying, you know, you need to, and actually, you know, you need to go with a brief you need to look what's on trend, you need to know what's what's the market is looking. And I was very adamant that I wouldn't do that. And that I would do it in the way that I that had happened with the first two fragrances. And I was sitting on the flight on the way to Paris, and I was thinking oh my gosh, maybe I should have done this, I'm going to arrive here and not have a clue. And maybe that was just a fluke, you know, number one, number two. And and actually, when I got there, it was exactly the same, I was able to work for a few days with her. And I put you know, together what I wanted. And immediately at the end of it in its complete form, that my story then came. So it was really evident to me then that actually I do see it as a as an art, like a painter or musician or anybody really who's creative because I'm I choose to tell my story through the art of perfume, and I feel that I can express myself well through it. And, and so that's you know, so I create the fragrances wherever we meet and Wherever we go, which is the joy of being able to be creative that way. The pure bs oils, then to answer your question, what are made in France, and then they're shipped to the UK. And then they're their bottles. It's so crazy, that notes can have a trend or like fragrances can have like a season. You know, I find that with colours in fashion, when you when Pantone goes the colour of the year is gonna be like, well, who decided that? Yeah, who came up with that? Was it someone that's got a whole load of purple paint set in the back that no need to shift? And so how like, notes can go that, you know, bergmark that was sold last year? Julie's been around for centuries, how can was just out this season? Yeah, exactly. And it's the same with seasons as well, obviously, you know, colour seasons. And I just get really annoyed that people try to put fragrances into season. And I suppose it's a bit with fashion to like he says you can't wear something that you had 20 years ago. But it's kind of like it's it shouldn't be masculine and feminine, and it shouldn't be. And in a season, I think fragrance is you just you should wear it, what makes you feel good. And you know, male or females should be able to wear whatever they want. So I totally get you on that. And what's been the reception. So you launched in 2017 2018. Right. Okay, so when you did the big launch, what was the initial feedback, you know, of the of the brand, the greatest? Yes, so I'll tell you, what actually happened was when I created the fragrances in, in grass and came home, I came home with the little laboratory bottles and at that stage, I only decided on the flight on the way back that I was going to start a business with these fragrances because I was so passionate about and what had happened to me and you know, the connection with our olfactory and senses, and I our olfactory systems connected to our memory. So it's the largest of our senses that is connected to our memory. So it is it is scientifically proven that I just thought my goodness, if this has happened to me, and I've had this amazing experience, I just want to tell my story and I want to introduce people to my fragrances as a gift that they would be able to connect with not my story but with the fragrances and actually be able to connect with their own story. And so, you know, obviously fragrance is amazing for it's not just about the past, either it's about the present and also we can make new fragrances or sorry, new memories for the future. So and that was the whole idea. I came back and I just had these bottles and I thought my gosh, you know I just want people to connect with their own story and I'm a great believer that Everybody has a story to tell. And everybody should tell it. So I wanted to be able to give people people also a place to a platform to tell their story and connect them through fragrance. And I remember thinking, oh my goodness, how am I going to do this, you know, if I wanted to luxury niche was important to me, because I love it, and it's just who I am. And I thought, I'm just going to have to go to London, and I'm going to have to see what who can help me. And I arrived in London, I had a couple of PR meetings, and I just went and I said to them, these are, I didn't even have my bottles or anything at this stage. I just said that these are, this is my story. These are my fragrances, this is what I want to do. Hi, can I do it? And I mean, I was really welcomed with open arms in London, I thought, you know, with a, with a beauty, or cosmetic range or beauty range, or whatever it is, fragrance is the most oversaturated of the industry. They people were saying, Do you know what you're getting yourself into? It is oversaturated. But they were saying, you know, we'll help you and they would go, okay, there's somebody here you can I'll introduce you to and from that. And arriving in London, I was only travelling back and forward, you know, because I'm based from Northern Ireland. And people just introduced me to somebody else who was able to help me with something else. And I was really astounded because that to me was obviously prior to the launch. But the feedback I got, I really believed in the power of fragrance. And I really believed that the fragrances were fantastic. And I really believed that. And you know what i everything that I've just spoke to you blank was really I was very passionate about it. But actually the fact that, you know, people had been in the industry for years and years, they also believed and they also saw there was something really different. And and I've had some amazing feedback and from launch to present day and off the brand. So when we did launch in 2018. And it did, yeah, we got amazing feedback. And I mean from across the world. So it's been great. That's amazing. Yeah. And it's, it kind of really is the journey and the story of the brand that I think piques people's interest. And I think you've got it in spades really. I mean, it's, it's a great story. And it's a great journey that you've already got behind you. And you can bring that forward and people can really I think it really resonates with people because I think smell is something that you do harken back to memories awaken, you know, you have nostalgic moments of smells. And, you know, like for example, if you put it into say like the watch world, the most expensive watch in the world is Paul Newman's Rolex, I believe the Daytona now that's just a standard Rolex really by standard, but because it was on Paul Newman's watch any, any war that pretty much every day what he raised, you know, that's now going for 21 million or wherever, yeah, but without the story behind it, then it's just a Rolex watch, that's worth probably about 1015 grand. Yeah, people really latch on to those stories. And I wonder if it's just so that they can talk about it in parties? Because it makes absolutely, and, you know, it's funny, it was one of the things that I had shied away from was my story. I didn't you know, even though I had got healing from the trauma, you know, it's a really positive story. It's, you know, it's, it's a story from that I was in complete darkness at one stage and I suppose walking into light does, how I can describe it and a lighter place and a happier place, and a place of healing. But frequence was that journey for me also to it did bring healing to me It brought joy and I think it's fragrances universal, because everybody's story significant to themselves. But fragrance has that power to allow us all to engage with it differently, if you know what I mean. And but yeah, so when I I didn't really tell much of my story when I started it. And I when I when people prodded a wee bit more insight, but you knew, but why or what was the story? And you know, I'm really happy to share it because I spoke about it for years. And I spoke used to speak to young adults about the effects of trauma and addictions. And, you know, so it's been, it's a massive, you know, journey for me, there's nothing that I am not afraid of talking about. But actually what I didn't want to do with the brand because I thought, oh, nobody wants to know my story. But then more people pulled it and you're right. People want to know your story. They want to have a really emotional connection. And once people then started to hear the story, they were like, you need to share it because it's a true real story and you need to connect that to your customers. So that's why then I started to introduce it. But yeah, you're right. I think brands Just they need to have that story, don't think, yeah, otherwise it just becomes another, another brand or it's just gets lost in the background really without some identity behind it. And I think people really do underestimate the sense of smell. Yeah, I've, I remember seeing years ago, and I've not even thought about it until I spoke to you now when, when Christopher Reeve came out of his coma, right, they introduced obviously, paralysed he couldn't move, he never did move. And they introduced a whole load of different things to him, for him to smell to bring him back round. Now, I don't know if it's online, it might be it, but you want to see his wife's reaction, when he gets give given like coffee, for example. And he just looked through camera and he goes coffee, and then they look at the white and she is just in balls in a she's Yes, she because he's now kind of becoming a bit more cognizant of what's around him, but it's the only thing that he's got, you know, he can't actually do anything else you can see, but he can't move sadly. But the whole thing about bringing back that kind of awakening to him and everyone around him that he's actually got something to enjoy. Absolutely. That's amazing, though, as well, because I'm a member of the fragrance foundation and their charity is actually Alzheimer's Association. And, and the reason behind that is because obviously when people you know, start to lose their memory, and their and, and that walk that really sad walk that, you know, family see them on, they find that their sense of smell is the last thing to go. And they they really connect with their past through that sense of smell. And so I totally understand that happening. I didn't see that happening. But you know, this, our sense of smell is so powerful. And it just it is and I do think we don't give it enough, you know, when when I started this journey, and I, you know, realise that our sense of smell is actually one of our largest sense, it is the largest sense connected to the memory. I just thought oh my goodness, that's like scientific with Brett. Yeah. Tanya, tangential question. Do you ever get requests, like now that people know that you can harness memories in a bottle? Please make my memory for me? Yeah, do you know what's really what I really love and what I really want to do and to extend You know, this too, is actually listening to people and listening to their story. And, and not telling me what they like or dislike and notes, but just telling me their story, then I go and create a fragrance for them. And and then that will be their unique fragrance. And I love the idea of people, you know, people finding I've had so many customers who just you know, I don't expect people to understand my story. Because after all, it is my story. And you know, it's unique to me, but actually people are it just makes them stop and go cause for what's my story. And when I get emails from people to say, you know, gosh, I had these memories and I they were blocked and you know, just listening to your story. And and it's not even just my frequency is it's the sense of smell around us everywhere. We should be just more aware of it. So nobody's asked me to build their memories. Okay, well, let me be the first I would like a combination, please. of grass and rain on cement. I don't know if anyone's that I keep saying to my girlfriend, if anyone could invent the rain on cement aroma candle, I would buy it up in droves because it is the best awakening. And how can you describe that? The it's an upward trajectory. Because it's the first thing you smell when you give up smoking. Yeah, give up smoking. You're like, what is that and you think, Oh my god, it's that wet rain on the cement that I had when I was a kid before I started smoking. And then when you smoke throughout your teens and your 20s and then you get your sense of smell back when you give up smoking. That's again the first smell that you get. So you get these these childhood memories come back. Absolutely. No, it's amazing. And why I asked you is because when I'm teaching people about, you know, training people and smelling I have this I feel that I have this unique way of teaching people how to smell so we don't concentrate on the ingredients is one thing so on our book boxes and bottles, everything's completely blank really you do see it when you go looking for it. But the whole idea and that is because just that hi I asked asked you there How did you know can you describe how you use what you smelled? I like people to do that with our fragrances as well. It's I they would say oh I don't like this or they go into stores and they say well like I like roots but I don't Jasmine and I want something with with you know, a woody smell and, and actually they're they're stopping themselves having an experience with fragrances that you know are probably beautiful. So what I actually would say to people is, you know, let them smell your fragrance first ask them how do they feel? What does it mean to them? And is there any specific memory that comes? And and I just I love the way you were able to very quickly there to tell me why that smell smells like progress. Yeah. Progress be the tagline for the poster. So yeah, but it's just been able to connect people with the fragrance rather than what they think they they like or what they they don't like. Yeah, I do like how the so you've got stories one and two. And you've Have you got three and four in the pipeline. I have I'm just finalising them at the moment. And I suppose just with the lock Dine and everything that's been going on. It's been it's put things behind a little I had hoped to have them and launched Finally, but then they're not but they should be at bay before the end of the year all being well. And yeah, so number three and four. I still have I've all I still have number and the other ones ready as well. But I just need to slow down and I get very excited because I'm very creative. And but yeah, so we've two more to hopefully to come out this year. Like the names as well reminds me of Led Zeppelin albums. So Zeppelin just released them in numbers. Yes, I did rocky until he got all you know, clever with bow bore and creed. Yeah, by that? Well, do you know why that is actually that was to take away people's and preconception of fragrance. So as I said to you, and I was in grass for the first time, I went in with that whole idea, I hit vanilla. And I'm not going to have vanilla. And but actually, when I smelt it and didn't know what I was smelling, I actually loved it. And then when something's blended, you know, when two things are blended together, it can smell completely different to another fragrance. So I didn't want people to have that preconception of the fragrances by it because of a name. I wanted to give people a chance to actually experience and connect with the fragrance first and then make a judgement. And so I think if people see sometimes a name on a bottle, they'll walk away from it before they even smell it. And if they see it, you know, an ingredient on the bottle, they'll do the same. So I wanted to remove that. I wanted to have a really pared back and minimalistic look. And and I just felt if I started to name them, it was going to actually just you knew it will. Yeah, totally. So I decided I would number them. All right, I like that. But then you might get to about five or six and like Rocky, you're left to kind of change it up. Well, I might have to might have to miss skip number five anyway. Yeah, so I might have to go to 4.4 and then maybe 5.5. Yeah, no, that's good. Yeah, no one likes five. Yeah, no, even Stallone like five. Yeah. Tanya, Tonya. Thanks so much for jumping on the podcast. It's been a pleasure stories. puffins.com is a place to go where people can have a look around the website and see what you like there. You can also have a look in Fenwick fourtner Mason's Harvey Nichols is a stockist available, you can find the website and best of luck. Thanks so much. Thank you so much. And it's been an absolute joy speaking to you. How about that I could have spoke to Tanya for literally hours. And that rain on cement fragrance is lightning in a bottle. Make it happen. Please done. Make sure you're supporting the good guys head over to stories puff farms calm and treat yourself or your loved one to some amazing fragrances. In the meantime, thanks for tuning in. If you like what you're hearing, leave a review. Maybe there's a brand or a person you think would make a great guest for the show. Put your suggestions and a comment on iTunes or wherever it is that you listen to your podcasts and until next time.